Herpes Simplex Mouth Lesions

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can a blood test tell the difference between oral HSV-1 and genital HSV-1?
    I already have herpes simplex type 1 of the mouth, but I want to be sure that I haven't also gotten it genitally. Will a blood test be able to differentiate oral HSV-1 and genital HSV-1 with no active lesions on either site?

    • ANSWER:
      No. A blood test can test the type of H, not the location. But trust me, if you have it genitally, you will know!

      Also, you will not have it genitally unless your privates have been in contact with it directly. For instance, if you receive oral sex from someone who has a cold sore. So if you know for certain that your privates haven't been in contact directly with an oral cold sore, you can be pretty certain that you dont have it genitally.

  2. QUESTION:
    How long can herpes simplex 1 live outside body?
    Someone in my family has a cold sore. She doesn't believe that it is contagious and constantly touches it and my stuff afterward -_- She even touched my underwear, which I didn't know until after I washed myself and changed into this new underwear. Can I get genital herpes from wearing this underwear when she touched it 15mins before I wore it?

    • ANSWER:
      "Someone in my family has a cold sore. She doesn't believe that it is contagious and constantly touches it and my stuff afterward" -- This someone needs education! Has she ever searched online and read anything about HSV-2? I find it hard to understand her belief. If this were true, then how is it people can pass it on to others??? Ask her that? And even if it weren't contagious, she displays an extreme lack of consideration for your feelings about this. Bring your parents into this. They need to know. And there shouldn't be anything stopping you from printing out information to show her. By the way, the "someone" doesn't have a cold sore. Colds don't cause sores. What she has is a herpes lesion.

      Now about your main concern. She has herpes simplex virus type 1, or HSV-1. The genital virus is HSV-2. Now each virus has a preferred site of infection. HSV-1 (orofacial herpes) prefers the face, mouth, nose and eyes (ocular herpes) and HSV-2 prefers the genital area. But HSV-1 can be transferred to the genitals and HSV-2 can be transferred to the face, etc.

      HSV doesn't survive very long outside the body and the chances of her transmitting this to you by touching your belongings are low but she shouldn't be doing this at all. On the up side (if you want to look at it that way), by constantly touching the lesion, the "someone" increases her chances of spreading the virus to other parts of her body including her eyes or fingers.

  3. QUESTION:
    How harmful to the body is the herpes virus?
    My friend recently confessed she has herpes and it's shocked me because she has a perfectly normal social life and looks totally heathly. She says she has breakouts and didn't know she had it. I'm confused about the virus, I know it stays in the body for life but is it harmful? Does it simply stay in the body dorment apart from these breakouts or does it damage organs and tissue slowly over time?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi dear ,
      There are currently eight known types of Human Herpesvirus:
      Herpes simplex type I

      Herpes simplex type II

      Varicella-zoster virus (VZV/HHV-3)

      Epstein-Barr virus (EBV/HHV-4)

      Cytomegalovirus (CMV/HHV-5)

      Human herpesvirus type 6 (HBLV/HHV-6)

      Human herpesvirus type 7 (HHV-7)

      Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8
      Herpes simplex virus types I and II (HHV1 & 2)
      Primary infection occurs through a break in the mucus membranes of the mouth or throat, via the eye or genitals or directly via minor abrasions in the skin. Because of the universal distribution of the virus, most individuals are infected by 1-2 years of age; initial infection is usually asymptomatic, although there may be minor local vesicular lesions. Local multiplication is followed by viraemia and systemic infection; and subsequent life-long latent infection with periodic reactivation.

      Systemic infection, eg fever, sore throat, and lymphadenopathy may pass unnoticed. If immunocompromised it may be life-threatening with fever, lymphadenopathy, pneumonitis, and hepatitis.
      Gingivostomatitis: Ulcers filled with yellow slough appear in the mouth.
      Herpetic whitlow: A breach in the skin allows the virus to enter the finger, causing a vesicle to form. Often affects childrens' nurses.
      Traumatic herpes (herpes gladiatorum): Vesicles develop at any site where HSV is ground into the skin by brute force.
      Eczema herpeticum: HSV infection of eczematous skin; usually children.
      Herpes simplex meningitis: This is uncommon and usually self-limiting (typically HSV II in women during a primary attack) - see meningitis.
      Genital herpes: Usually HSV type 2 See genital herpes simplex
      HSV keratitis: Corneal dendritic ulcers. Avoid steroids.
      Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: Usually HSV type1. Spreads centripetally, eg from cranial nerve ganglia, to frontal and temporal lobes. Suspect if fever, fits, headaches, odd behaviour, dysphasia, hemiparesis, or coma or subacute brainstem encephalitis, meningitis, or myelitis; see HSV Encephalitis

      feel free to ask

  4. QUESTION:
    What makes your teeth whiter and helps your breath smell good?
    Are there any good mouth washes or toothpastes that work good and make your teeth whiter? Also what helps with bad breath? Any special mouth wash or toothpaste?
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Most cases (85–90%), bad breath originates in the mouth itself. The intensity of bad breath differs during the day, due to eating certain foods (such as garlic, onions, meat, fish, and cheese), obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Since the mouth is exposed to less oxygen and is inactive during the night, the odor is usually worse upon awakening ("morning breath"). Bad breath may be transient, often disappearing following eating, brushing one's teeth, flossing, or rinsing with specialized mouthwash.

      Cause's
      1. Tongue
      The most common location is the tongue. Tongue bacteria produce malodorous compounds and fatty acids, and account for 80 to 90 percent of all cases of mouth-related bad breath
      Cleaning the tongue
      The most widely-known reason to clean the tongue is for the control of bad breath. Methods used against bad breath, such as mints, mouth sprays, mouthwash or gum, may only temporarily mask the odors created by the bacteria on the tongue, but cannot cure bad breath because they do not remove the source of the bad breath. In order to prevent the production of the sulfur-containing compounds mentioned above, the bacteria on the tongue must be removed, as must the decaying food debris present on the rear areas of the tongue. Most people who clean their tongue use a tongue cleaner (tongue scraper), or a toothbrush.

      2.Mouth
      There are over 600 types of bacteria found in the average mouth.
      Other parts of the mouth may also contribute to the overall odor, but are not as common as the back of the tongue. These locations are, in order of descending prevalence: inter-dental and sub-gingival niches, faulty dental work, food-impaction areas in between the teeth, abscesses, and unclean dentures.Oral based lesions caused by viral infections like Herpes Simplex and HPV may also contribute to bad breath.

      3.Gum disease
      Advanced periodontal disease is a common cause. Waste products from the anaerobic bacteria growing below the gumline (subgingival) have a foul smell and have been clinically demonstrated to produce a very intense bad breath. Removal of the . tartar or hard plaqueand friable tissue has been shown to improve mouth odor considerably.

      4.Nose
      In this occurrence, the air exiting the nostrils has a pungent odor that differs from the oral odor. Nasal odor may be due to sinus infections or foreign bodies.

      5.Tonsils
      small bits of calcified matter in tonsillar crypts called tonsilloliths that smell extremely foul when released and can cause bad breath.

      6.Stomach
      very uncommon source of bad breath. The esophagus is a closed and collapsed tube, and continuous flow (as opposed to a simple burp) of gas or putrid substances from the stomach indicates a health problem—such as reflux serious enough to be bringing up stomach contents or a fistula between the stomach and the esophagus—which will demonstrate more serious manifestations than just foul odor.

      7.Systemic diseases
      1. Fetor hepaticus: an example of a rare type of bad breath caused by chronic liver failure.
      2. Lower respiratory tract infections (bronchial and lung infections).
      3. Renal infections and renal failure.
      4. Carcinoma.
      5. Diabetes mellitus.

      Management

      1. Gently cleaning the tongue surface twice daily is the most effective way to keep bad breath in control; that can be achieved using a tooth brush, tongue cleaner or tongue brush/scraper to wipe off the bacterial biofilm, debris, and mucus. Scraping or otherwise damaging the tongue should be avoided, and scraping of the V-shaped row of taste buds found at the extreme back of the tongue should also be avoided. Brushing a small amount of antibacterial mouth rinse or tongue gel onto the tongue surface will further inhibit bacterial action.

      2. Eating a healthy breakfast with rough foods helps clean the very back of the tongue.

      3. Chewing gum: Since dry-mouth can increase bacterial buildup and cause or worsen bad breath, chewing sugarless gum can help with the production of saliva, and thereby help to reduce bad breath. Chewing may help particularly when the mouth is dry, or when one cannot perform oral hygiene procedures after meals.

      4. Gargling right before bedtime with an effective mouthwash.

      5. Maintaining proper oral hygiene, including daily tongue cleaning, brushing, flossing, and periodic visits to dentists and hygienists. Flossing is particularly important in removing rotting food debris and bacterial plaque from between the teeth, especially at the gum line.

      Mouthwashes

      Mouthwashes often contain antibacterial agents including cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorhexidine (which can cause temporary staining of the teeth), zinc gluconate, essential oils, and chlorine dioxide. Zinc and chlorhexidine provide strong synergistic effect. They may also contain alcohol, which is a drying agent.

      Thanks,

  5. QUESTION:
    Can you get a canker sore on your lip? How can you tell a canker sore from herpes?
    I recently got a bump on my upper lip and im wondering weather its a canker sore or herpes. ive never had cold sores.

    • ANSWER:
      Canker Sores: Medically, it is known as aphthous ulcers. Even though it looks very similar to fever blisters but they have different characteristics. Firstly, canker sore is not contagious like fever blisters. It occurs INSIDE the mouth only and is comparatively bigger in size. The exact cause behind this problem is not clearly known. It may run in families.

      Herpes or HSV-1 (Cold sores) are Fever Blisters: This is also known as cold sores and is caused due to infection by herpes simplex virus type 1. The blisters appear both inside as well as outside the oral cavity and are accompanied by some more symptoms like swollen lymph nodes and fever. They are painful, and are open sores or lesions in or around the mouth, can cluster up or be a single blister. So if you have a sore ON your lip it is most likely a cold sore, if it is INSIDE your mouth most likely a canker sore. Good luck

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the best OTC or at home treatment for a fever blister "cold sore"?
    My 11 year occasionally gets a fever blister on the outside of his mouth. Looks horrible, have taken him to the doctor before and he gave me a prescription for some cream. Is there anything over the counter that works just as well, but is more gentle on my pockets?

    • ANSWER:
      The reason your child has this sore is a virus. He has been exposed the herpes simplex type1 virus. This virus will follow a nerve pathway and cause sores anywhere along that nerve pathway. There are a few things that can be done to help decrease the amount of outbreaks a person has. Minimize exposure to the sun by wearing protective devices such as a baseball cap. This can be done in the winter and summer. Also decrease the amount of exposure to extreme cold or heat with a barrier such as a scarf. There are over the counter treatments, called topical ointments that will help with symptom control, but sadly none of these have an actual drug that will decrease the outbreaks or minimize them. There are prescription drugs that will increase the outbreak time and take it from 2 weeks down to 7 days.Adequate rest is needed for an outbreak, as "fever blisters" can make the person feel exhausted. Cold sores are quite painful for the person who has with them. It is not ususal to feel pain at the site before there is a blister, burning, tingling lets the person know what is coming. Once the blister appears it is sore and will begin to dry and form a dry yellow crust surrounding the lesion. Herpes is contagious, from the moment a blister is seen until the area is dry and no longer weeping clear fluid. Cold sores can give the suffer body aches, lymph node swelling, and general not feeling well complaints. Here is more information
      http://www.ashastd.org/herpes/herpes_learn_questions.cfm
      It is possible to transmitted sores from around the mouth to the genital area, make sure your son learns to wash his hands BEFORE and AFTER using the bathroom. I hope this has helped you to help your son.

  7. QUESTION:
    Can you get herpes from sharing contacts with another person?
    So my aunt has genital herps, but I didn't think anything about it when she asked to wear my contacts for the night. Don't lecture me about how you're not supposed to share anything like that with anyone, I already know. I was just wondering, can you get it from sharing contacts, or anything of that kind of nature? I know you can get it from cold sores, and having sex, but from eye fluids? Help, I don't want herps, haha.

    • ANSWER:
      "Can you get herpes from sharing contacts with another person? So my aunt has genital herps, but I didn't think anything about it when she asked to wear my contacts for the night." -- Was your aunt planning to wear your contacts on her genitals?? I don't see the connection.

      "Don't lecture me about how you're not supposed to share anything like that with anyone, I already know" -- Apparently already knowing didn't do you any good. Just making an observation. What you should be concerned about are ocular infections, not HSV-2. You could give your aunt an infection or she could give you one. I expect you cleaned them well when you got them back. After the fact is too late to worry.

      "I was just wondering, can you get it from sharing contacts, or anything of that kind of nature?" -- Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is genital herpes. Its preferred site of infection is the genitalia. It can be transferred to the mouth and rarely to the eyes but if your aunt had ocular herpes, I would certainly hope she wouldn't be asking to borrow something as personal as contact lenses and I think you'd be very much aware of this particular infection. It's almost always caused by HSV-1 not 2. Her having HSV-2 has nothing to do with her eyes.

      "I know you can get it from cold sores, and having sex, but from eye fluids?" -- You don't get HSV-2 from orofacial herpes lesions ("cold sores") as these are caused by an HSV-1 infection. Different virus. And you don't have to have sex to transmit the virus, just direct contact with lesions. That's why condoms can't always prevent infection, they don't always cover all the lesions.

  8. QUESTION:
    I made out with this girl and recieved oral sex, and im scared i have herpes?
    I made out with this girl and recieved oral sex, her friend then told me she had herpes but she was joking. I still freaked out and I have been really scared. I got a cold sore 3 weeks after, but I have always gotten cold sores when ive been under alot of stress, and its finals week. I cant tell my parents im scared i might have herpes either. I need help!

    • ANSWER:
      Okay Chris. I have a twist in the previous answers given to you. Here's the deal. As far as studies have shown to date, there are Type 1 and Type 2 herpes simplex viruses. Historically, before the 1980's dermatologists regionalized Type 1 to oral/facial (cold sores) zone, while Type 2 was associated with the genital and buttock area. As with everything in nature, however, viruses have been very successful in adaptation. So, now we're finding that Type 1 or 2 can be easily be found all over the body.

      That being the case, potentially you could even self-innoculate your own genitals via mouth-to-mouth contact with a partner with that same partner rendering oral-genital contact to you. To make this issue even more twisty, studies in the 1980's have shown that transfer of the virus can be done in non-active lesion contact. That is why we have seen T.V. ads encouraging sexually active females with a history of vulva-vaginal herpes to take an oral medication to suppresss the transfer of this virus to sexual contacts.

      As you know from public health information, multiple forms of sex with multiple sex partners is very risky to not only herpes simplex virus, but the full spectrum and stds.

      What is done is done, Chris. I encourage you to take all these answers that you have been given and make a decision about cost/benefit in your behavior. Now then rather than stressing about this, transfer that energy into boundary adjustment. To continue to beat yourself up would be self-defeating. To habitually be self-defeating will put your esteem focus inward. Choose to look outward, e.g....'wow, I just learned something here that will take me through the rest of my life'.

  9. QUESTION:
    Just cause I have a cold sore does that mean I have herpes?
    I have recently gotten a cold sore. I usually get the in the winter but it is cold here in Chicago. I was reading about cold sores and why they can trigger an outbreak which i just had my id stolen. But i am only 19 and I'm a virgin never even had a relationship. But does this mean I have the std type? I thought this was just caused by cold personally. I am worried my whole i will be transferring this to people. I worried I have herpes which is aggravating.

    • ANSWER:
      "Just cause I have a cold sore does that mean I have herpes?" -- Yes it does.

      "I was reading about cold sores and why they can trigger an outbreak which i just had my id stolen." -- Something's wrong here. Do you know what a euphenism is? It's the substitution of an agreeable or inoffensive expression for one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant. "Cold sore" and "fever blister" are euphenisms for herpes lesions. And if you have a herpes lesion on or around your mouth, you have herpes simplex type 1, HSV-1. If you've never been intimate with a another person and have never had sex, then this is not genital herpes (herpes simplex type 2, HSV-2). Herpes lesions don't trigger an outbreak of anything. They ARE the outbreak. I don't understand what your ID has to do with this.

      "I thought this was just caused by cold personally." -- No, it's caused by HSV-1.

      "I am worried my whole i will be transferring this to people." -- Well that's certainly possible. After all, some one transferred it to YOU.

      "I worried I have herpes which is aggravating." -- You do have herpes. Herpes simplex type 1 is also called oral herpes and orofacial herpes. Do some research when you have time.

  10. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of and breath?
    I use mouth was everyday. I drink a lot of fluids. I brush my teeth twice a day. What am I doing wrong? I drink a lot of milk so could that be it? HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      most cases (85–90%), bad breath originates in the mouth itself. The intensity of bad breath differs during the day, due to eating certain foods (such as garlic, onions, meat, fish, and cheese), obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption.Since the mouth is exposed to less oxygen and is inactive during the night, the odor is usually worse upon awakening ("morning breath"). Bad breath may be transient, often disappearing following eating, brushing one's teeth, flossing, or rinsing with specialized mouthwash.

      Cause's
      1. Tongue
      The most common location is the tongue. Tongue bacteria produce malodorous compounds and fatty acids, and account for 80 to 90 percent of all cases of mouth-related bad breath
      Cleaning the tongue
      The most widely-known reason to clean the tongue is for the control of bad breath. Methods used against bad breath, such as mints, mouth sprays, mouthwash or gum, may only temporarily mask the odors created by the bacteria on the tongue, but cannot cure bad breath because they do not remove the source of the bad breath. In order to prevent the production of the sulfur-containing compounds mentioned above, the bacteria on the tongue must be removed, as must the decaying food debris present on the rear areas of the tongue. Most people who clean their tongue use a tongue cleaner (tongue scraper), or a toothbrush.

      2.Mouth
      There are over 600 types of bacteria found in the average mouth.
      Other parts of the mouth may also contribute to the overall odor, but are not as common as the back of the tongue. These locations are, in order of descending prevalence: inter-dental and sub-gingival niches, faulty dental work, food-impaction areas in between the teeth, abscesses, and unclean dentures.Oral based lesions caused by viral infections like Herpes Simplex and HPV may also contribute to bad breath.

      3.Gum disease
      Advanced periodontal disease is a common cause. Waste products from the anaerobic bacteria growing below the gumline (subgingival) have a foul smell and have been clinically demonstrated to produce a very intense bad breath. Removal of the . tartar or hard plaqueand friable tissue has been shown to improve mouth odor considerably.

      4.Nose
      In this occurrence, the air exiting the nostrils has a pungent odor that differs from the oral odor. Nasal odor may be due to sinus infections or foreign bodies.

      5.Tonsils
      small bits of calcified matter in tonsillar crypts called tonsilloliths that smell extremely foul when released and can cause bad breath.

      6.Stomach
      very uncommon source of bad breath. The esophagus is a closed and collapsed tube, and continuous flow (as opposed to a simple burp) of gas or putrid substances from the stomach indicates a health problem—such as reflux serious enough to be bringing up stomach contents or a fistula between the stomach and the esophagus—which will demonstrate more serious manifestations than just foul odor.

      7.Systemic diseases
      1. Fetor hepaticus: an example of a rare type of bad breath caused by chronic liver failure.
      2. Lower respiratory tract infections (bronchial and lung infections).
      3. Renal infections and renal failure.
      4. Carcinoma.
      5. Diabetes mellitus.

      Management

      1. Gently cleaning the tongue surface twice daily is the most effective way to keep bad breath in control; that can be achieved using a tooth brush, tongue cleaner or tongue brush/scraper to wipe off the bacterial biofilm, debris, and mucus. Scraping or otherwise damaging the tongue should be avoided, and scraping of the V-shaped row of taste buds found at the extreme back of the tongue should also be avoided. Brushing a small amount of antibacterial mouth rinse or tongue gel onto the tongue surface will further inhibit bacterial action.

      2. Eating a healthy breakfast with rough foods helps clean the very back of the tongue.

      3. Chewing gum: Since dry-mouth can increase bacterial buildup and cause or worsen bad breath, chewing sugarless gum can help with the production of saliva, and thereby help to reduce bad breath. Chewing may help particularly when the mouth is dry, or when one cannot perform oral hygiene procedures after meals.

      4. Gargling right before bedtime with an effective mouthwash.

      5. Maintaining proper oral hygiene, including daily tongue cleaning, brushing, flossing, and periodic visits to dentists and hygienists. Flossing is particularly important in removing rotting food debris and bacterial plaque from between the teeth, especially at the gum line.

      Mouthwashes

      Mouthwashes often contain antibacterial agents including cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorhexidine (which can cause temporary staining of the teeth), zinc gluconate, essential oils, and chlorine dioxide. Zinc and chlorhexidine provide strong synergistic effect. They may also contain alcohol, which is a drying agent.

      Thanks,

  11. QUESTION:
    How does HIV interact with your body to cause the symptoms?What other systems of the body are affected?
    I need an answer to this question for my research project.I can't find any answers.
    Links to website would be helpful.
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      What are the symptoms of HIV? How does HIV change your body? The symptoms of HIV after being infected; AIDS defining illnesses occur if you don't get treatment. What do the symptoms of HIV do to your body? This page will provide the answer to your frequently asked question about the symptoms of HIV.

      Answer:
      HIV is a virus that uses the genetic material from our CD4 cells to make more copies of itself. The virus likes one particular cell in our immune system called a CD4 cell or t-cell. When it uses that cell's genetic material, it damages the T-cell making it unable to do its job in our immune system. The more of these CD4 cells that are damaged, the weaker your immune system becomes. Eventually, your immune system will become so weak that it will not be able to protect you from other illnesses and infections, thus you become sick. Simply put, HIV doesn't make you sick. It weakens your immune system, allowing other illnesses and infections to make you sick.
      HIV: Early Symptoms
      The earliest symptoms of HIV can resemble the flu and they generally clear up within a month or two. These symptoms may include fever, headache, fatigue, and swelling in the lymph nodes, particularly those in the neck and groin. However, not everyone who acquires HIV will experience these symptoms. Similarly, for several years, perhaps as long as a decade, a person with HIV may not have any symptoms at all. During that time, though, the virus is still multiplying and it's possible to transmit HIV to someone else.

      HIV progresses differently for each person affected. The course of the disease is determined by the specific infections or complications a person with HIV develops. HIV complications can affect different parts of the body: Some are localized to the mouth, others in the brain, and others result in total body changes like losing body weight. Skin conditions are also common.

      HIV: Skin Effects
      Several of the main skin conditions that affect people with HIV are caused by viruses most people already have in their bodies. However, these viruses typically do not cause disease in people whose immune systems are healthy. Some of the more common dermatological, or skin, effects of HIV include:

      Varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection. VZV is a herpes virus which causes both chicken pox (varicella) and shingles (herpes zoster). Most adults have already been exposed to this virus. HIV-infected individuals may develop new skin sores from either of these diseases. HIV patients who didn’t have chicken pox earlier in their life may develop the condition, which in some cases can affect their organs and become life-threatening. Shingles can be localized to one area or it can spread over large areas of the skin. Shingles lesions can become infected and even lead to the development of encephalitis (brain inflammation) in people with HIV.Herpes simplex virus (HSV). HSV was one of the first diseases identified in people with advanced HIV disease and is now considered one of the AIDS-defining diseases by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HSV causes open sores that may look like a cluster of blisters. They pop and crust over before healing completely; this process takes about 7 to 10 days in otherwise healthy individuals, but in people with advanced HIV disease, the sores may enlarge to 2 to 10 centimeters in diameter, becoming crusted and painful.Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). Kaposi’s sarcoma is a cancer caused by a herpes virus called Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus. Healthy individuals may be infected with Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus without developing the cancer. However, as HIV-infected people become sicker, KS may develop.

  12. QUESTION:
    My girlfriend just found out she has mouth herpes?
    Just wondering if it's safe to kiss her even when she doesn't have flare-ups. Anyone know the answer? What are the chances of me getting herpes then?

    • ANSWER:
      "Mouth herpes," or cold sores are usually caused by the herpes simplex virus 1 and are different from genital herpes, which are generally caused by Herpes simplex virus 2. If you kiss her when she has an active cold core, then there is a good chance that you will also become infected as it is contagious. It can also be spread by things like sharing a drink when she has an active lesion. When she has no signs of an outbreak, then there is a veryyy low chance that you'll also get the virus. Also, make sure to avoid oral sex if she has an outbreak. The first signs of a cold sore are often a tingling sensation , itchiness, or pain at the site. Cold sores are contagious from the first sign b/c it means the virus is currently active.

      Just to repeat it, cold sores are very common.

  13. QUESTION:
    What is a lethal amount of lysine to take in a day?
    I've been taking several 500MG pills for the past couple of days to get rid of a cold sore.

    • ANSWER:
      Lysine is one of numerous amino acids that the body needs for growth and tissue repair. It is classified as one of the nine "essential" amino acids because you need to get it from outside sources such as foods or supplements--in other words the body can't make it on its own.

      Like all amino acids, lysine functions as a building block for proteins. It's also a key player in the production of various enzymes, hormones, and disease-fighting antibodies.

      Many foods supply lysine, but the richest sources by far include red meats, fish, and dairy products (milk, eggs, cheese). Vegetables, on the other hand, are generally a poor source of lysine, with the exception of legumes (beans, peas, lentils).

      There is currently no official recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for lysine. It is estimated, however, that the daily requirement for an adult is approximately 12 mg per kilogram (2.2 lb) of body weight. While many people satisfy their need for lysine through dietary sources, supplements are now popular for treating and preventing specific ailments as well.

      Health Benefits

      Researchers are exploring the value of lysine supplementation and the consumption of lysine-rich foods for lowering cholesterol, improving athletic performance, and enhancing recovery after surgery.

      Some nutritionally oriented physicians and dentists recommend taking lysine during an outbreak of canker sores to speed healing. The exact cause of these tiny but quite painful mouth ulcers is unclear, but most research indicates that a virus is responsible. However, there have been almost no clinical trials using lysine as a remedy for canker sores.

      The most promising application of lysine is its use in managing and preventing painful and unsightly herpes sores caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV).

      Specifically, lysine may help to:

      # Prevent and relieve cold sores (herpes). Exciting research over the past several decades suggests that lysine may be helpful in controlling herpes simplex-related infections. There are two types of this virus: type 1, which typically causes cold sores or fever blisters around the mouth, and type 2, which tends to cause genital sores. However, both forms can cause eruptions around the mouth or on the genitals. Once infected with the virus, you have it permanently. It may lie dormant, but it doesn't go away. Outbreaks are usually painful and unsightly, as well as contagious.

      A few years ago, researchers discovered that in order to grow (replicate), the herpes virus needs arginine, another common amino acid. (Foods high in arginine include chocolate, peanuts, almonds, seeds, cereal grains, gelatin, and raisins.) Lysine competes with arginine for absorption and entry into tissue cells. And when lysine is present, it inhibits the growth of HSV by knocking out arginine.

      This makes a diet high in lysine and low in arginine a useful tool in managing HSV infections. In a recent study, participants consumed large amounts of lysine (about 1 gram three times each day) while restricting food sources of arginine. A significant number of participants (74%) noticed an improvement in their HSV infections and a decrease in the number of outbreaks.

      Lysine supplements (as opposed to foods high in this nutrient) can also play an important role in staving off and reducing the severity of herpes-related cold sores. Results of a six-month trial involving more than 50 people indicate that lysine is far more effective than a placebo in preventing cold sores. Participants given a placebo had more than twice as many such infections as those taking lysine. Moreover, the herpes sores that did develop in the lysine group tended to be milder, and to heal faster, than the outbreaks in the placebo group.

      Lysine supplements may even prevent HSV outbreaks in chronic sufferers.

      # Speed healing of shingles lesions. Painful shingles blisters are caused by a reactivation of varicella-zoster virus, an infection that started out as an attack of chickenpox. Herpes zoster is closely related to herpes simplex, however, and lysine appears to have a similar role to play in treating an eruption of shingles. Keep in mind, however, that most nutritionally oriented physicians will combine lysine therapy with conventional antiviral medications such as acyclovir or valacyclovir.

      Forms

      * tablet
      * powder
      * liquid
      * capsule

      Dosage Information

      Special tips:

      --Of all the amino acids, lysine is the most sensitive to the effects of food processing, such as dry heat. The amount of protein available in legumes and other sources of lysine can be significantly reduced if they have been toasted or roasted.

      --Common foods high in lysine include nonfat milk (8 fluid ounces, or 245 grams, contains about 660 mg of lysine) and whole-wheat bread (one slice of wheat bread, or 28 grams, provides 85 mg of lysine).

      For canker sores: Take 1,000 mg L-lysine three times a day with meals while a canker sore is present. Reduce the dose to 500 mg three times a day for one week following healing.

      For cold sores: Take 1,000 mg L-lysine three times a day with meals for flare-ups. If you are subject to recurrent outbreaks of cold sores, continue on a maintenance dosage of 1,000 mg day.

      For shingles: Take 1,000 mg L-lysine three times a day with meals during flare-ups. Reduce the dose to 500 mg three times a day for one week after healing.

      Guidelines for Use

      # For a severe initial outbreak of genital herpes or shingles, see a doctor to confirm that you have the condition and be sure to take one of the prescription antiviral drugs such as acyclovir.

      # Don't drink milk at the same time you take lysine.

      General Interaction

      # In very large doses (10 to 30 grams a day), lysine increases the toxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin, neomycin, and streptomycin.

      Cautions

      # Side effects are rare with lysine supplements, although a few cases of abdominal cramps and diarrhea have been reported with very high doses (more than 10 grams a day).

      Ailments

      Dosage
      Canker Sores
      500 mg L-lysine 3 times a day
      Cold Sores
      1,000 mg L-lysine 3 times a day for flare-ups, then 500 mg a day.
      Shingles
      1,000 mg L-lysine 3 times a day during acute stage; to help prevent recurrences, 1,000 mg a day.

  14. QUESTION:
    Is there a link between chicken pox and herpes?
    Is it true that if you have had chicken pox, you can get cold sores on your mouth without having an STD?

    • ANSWER:
      Chicken pox and shingles are caused by the varicella virus. Another name for shingles is herpes Zoster. This is probably why you're thinking that chicken pox is the same thing as herpes or is somehow related.

      Herpes Zoster is NOT the same virus as the herpes that causes cold sores and the genital lesions associated with the STD (these are caused by Herpes Simplex virus).

      Just because the same types of medications (antivirals like Acyclovir) are used to treat both Herpes Simplex and Herpes Zoster doesn't mean they're the same virus. It's just like with antibiotics...an antibiotic can "kill" many different types of bacteria just like an antiviral can treat many different types of viruses.

  15. QUESTION:
    Can you get cold sores on your forehead?
    My girlfriend has something on her forehead that we think is a cold sore, but can you get them there?
    There was no funny business going on with her head by the way.

    • ANSWER:
      Herpes labialis is an infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. It leads to the development of small and usually painful blisters on the skin of the lips, mouth, gums, or lip area. These blisters are commonly called cold sores or fever blisters. Infection may be severe and dangerous if it occurs in or near the eye, or if it happens in immunosuppressed people. Herpes viruses are contagious. Contact may occur directly, or through contact with infected razors, towels, dishes, and other shared articles. Occasionally, oral-to-genital contact may spread oral herpes to the genitals (and vice versa).(MedlinePlus)
      Oral herpes lesions typically occur on the lips, but can occur almost anywhere on the face. They can also occur on the fixed mucosa inside the mouth, including the hard palate (roof of the mouth), and gingiva (gums).(Wikipedia)
      Please see the web pages for more details and images on Herpes Labialis.

  16. QUESTION:
    I have a 3 year old with a sore in his mouth. What is it? What can I do before we get to the doctor?
    It is between his upper lip and his gums at the very top. It looks like a white circle and it has a red streak coming down to his teeth. All of his teeth are clean and we brush them about once everyother day (I know it should be more often, but he is 3 and he runs).

    Please help. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      If this white area is an ulcer most likely it is a cold sore (Herpes simplex) or Canker sore (unknown cause). Sometimes a cold sore can be very difficult the first time. When children are first exposed to herpes simplex their first outbreak is often multiple lesions in the mouth and on the lips or it can be just one larger than normal one. However, it could also be a canker sore which may have been caused by trauma during brushing when the plastic of the toothbrush hit his gums b/c he was squirming and this can induce a ulcer like this. Just try and keep it free of bacteria, use hydrogen peroxide you can gently put a little on w/ a Q tip. You could get some topical anesthetic like ambesol to put on it but it might burn a little at first.

  17. QUESTION:
    Can u get rid of certian types of heripes?
    My daughter developed these red pimples around her mouth,in the center they have a clear type of liquid. The Doctor says that its a type of heripe! What can i Do to get rid of them and what Can i do so i can prevent them from comming back Again!

    • ANSWER:
      Once you have herpes you always have a type of herpes. Doesn't mean they will come back all the time but they will come back.

      Found this text on it:

      Ninety percent of all people will have at least one cold sore, (herpes simplex outbreak) sometime in their life. Some children who are affected with cold sores may become seriously ill. However, after the first cold sore infection, many people develop antibodies to the cold sore virus and never have another cold sore. About 40% of American adults, however, have repeated cold sores.

      Cold sores are highly contagious when a flare up is present, and a cold sore can be transmitted even when there is no visible signs of a cold sore, this is called viral shedding. Children often become infected with the cold sore virus by contact with parents, siblings or other close relatives who have cold sores.

      The cold sore virus is highly contagious. Anyone experiencing symptoms of a cold sore must be very cautious when being intimate with another person so as not to transmit the cold sore virus. Those who have symptoms of a cold sore should refrain from contact with another person to help avoid transmission of cold sores. If the cold sore virus has been transmitted, the infection is permanent.

      Cold sores can be either a one time event or reoccur. Possible causes of a cold sore reactivating may include stress, fever, menstruation, cold, fatigue and sunlight. Recurrent cold sores usually occur as lesions in or around the mouth

  18. QUESTION:
    What is difference between puss in a pimple, zit, fever blister or wart?
    I recently had to pop one and it just got me to thinking what are the slimy contents

    • ANSWER:
      A zit and a pimple are the same thing. The pus is there because the pimple is infected. It's best not to pop them in the future, it can make a scar. If you feel you must open it up, treat it like a sterile operation. Wash with soap and water, make a small opening with a sterile needle, then wash again with soap and water. It will heal better and not leave a scar. (Personal experience)

      A fever blister is the same as a cold sore. "A fever blister located on the lips, mouth, and face is usually caused by the highly contagious herpes simplex type 1 virus. Only a small percentage are caused by herpes simplex type 2 (the type usually associated with genital lesions). While there is no cure, there are medications that will relieve the pain and itch and speed the healing of the blister."
      http://www.umm.edu/ency/article/002089.htm

      According to wikipedia, "A wart is generally a small, rough tumor, typically on hands and feet, that can resemble a cauliflower or a solid blister. Warts are common, and are caused by a viral infection, specifically by the human papillomavirus (HPV) and are contagious when in contact with the skin of another. It is also possible to get warts from using towels or other objects. They typically disappear after a few months but can last for years and can reoccur. A few papilloma viruses are known to cause cervical cancer."
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wart

  19. QUESTION:
    How can i prevent getting cold sores from my boyfriend?
    he gets them occasionally and I'm extremely paranoid I'm going to get infected. what can i do to prevent infection?

    • ANSWER:
      You may not be able to prevent viral transmission. "Cold sore" and "fever blister" are euphenisms for herpes simplex virus type 1. He's most contagious during an outbreak and the virus can be transmitted through direct contact with a herpes lesion, infected razors, towels, dishes, straws, glasses, eating utensils, food, cigarettes and anything that has touched his mouth or face and then touches yours. So avoid contact both direct and indirect during these times. But there's also a smaller chance of transmission between outbreaks due to viral shedding.

      On the other hand, you may already have HSV-1 and are asymptomatic.

  20. QUESTION:
    How does the herpes simplex virus spread?
    just need a little help with my biology, thank you all
    im sorry i mis posted the Question was how does a herpes virus enter a cell... SORRY VERY SORRY

    • ANSWER:
      Most people get Type 1 infections, which cause cold sores, during infancy or childhood. They usually get it from close contact with family members or friends who carry the virus. It can be transmitted by kissing, sharing eating utensils, or by sharing towels. The sores most commonly affect the lips, mouth, nose, chin, or cheeks and occur shortly after exposure. Patients may barely notice any symptoms or find these sores annoying and seek medical attention.

      Most people get Type 2 infections, which cause genital sores, following sexual contact with an infected person. The virus affects anywhere between five and twenty million people, up to 20% of all sexually active adults in the United States.

      The lesions of both types of herpes simplex, can be spread by touching an unaffected part of the body immediately after touching a herpes lesion.

      Read more: http://www.aad.org/public/publications/pamphlets/viral_herpes_simplex.html#ixzz1BuUXoW6q

  21. QUESTION:
    Whats the difference between genital warts and genital skin tags?

    • ANSWER:
      Genital herpes, known specifically as herpes, is an STD caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). It is mainly passed on through direct contact with the vagina, genital skin or the mucous-covered linings within the mouth. This particular form of STD is a viral infection that enters ones skin or linings via the microscopic tears. The virus would then travel inside the body to settle permanently in the nerve roots within the spinal cord.

      When an individual suffers a herpes outbreak, it means that the virus had already traveled through the nerve fibers and had met the original site of the infection. The moment the virus reaches the skin, blisters and redness emerge. Subsequent outbreaks will then be experienced sporadically right after the initial manifestation of the outbreak. They could emerge every week or years apart.

      The HSV-1 or herpes simplex virus-1 and the HSV-2 or herpes simplex virus-2 are two forms of herpes that cause genital lesions. The HSV-1 is the one responsible for the blisters in the mouth area and the HSV-2 brings about lesions or genital sores around the anus area. People having suppressed immune systems, as a result of either stress, medications or infection, would normally experience longer and more frequent herpes outbreaks.

  22. QUESTION:
    Can a pea sized red-brownish (more red) spot on penis be syphilis even if I am a virgin?
    I have not had sex, but there is a pea sized red-brownish (more red) spot on my penis, I was wondering what it could be? I looked up some symptoms and saw mostly syphilis, but I am a virgin.
    I also had a sore throat for a day, not sure if this is related at all.

    • ANSWER:
      The HSV-1 or herpes simplex virus-1 and the HSV-2 or herpes simplex virus-2 are two forms of herpes that cause genital lesions. The HSV-1 is the one responsible for the blisters in the mouth area and the HSV-2 brings about lesions or genital sores around the anus area. People having suppressed immune systems, as a result of either stress, medications or infection, would normally experience longer and more frequent herpes outbreaks.

  23. QUESTION:
    Can Type 1 herpes be in the genital area?
    I had to go to the gynecologist because my vagina felt like it was burning and it was red and the doctor told me I had type 1 herpes. So isn't that oral herpes? why was I feeling something in the genital area but not the mouth? I've never had a cold sore or anything. With type 1 herpes am I not suppose to have oral sex/sex anymore?

    • ANSWER:
      The HSV-1 or herpes simplex virus-1 and the HSV-2 or herpes simplex virus-2 are two forms of herpes that cause genital lesions. The HSV-1 is the one responsible for the blisters in the mouth area and the HSV-2 brings about lesions or genital sores around the anus area. People having suppressed immune systems, as a result of either stress, medications or infection, would normally experience longer and more frequent herpes outbreaks.

  24. QUESTION:
    If i have a cold sore and my boyfriend kisses me can i get it down there ?
    Well me and my boyfriend were there and i told him i have a cold sore he said he dident care and kisses me and than ate me out, im scared that i can now get it in my vagina, i mean he dident have a cold sore but he came in contact with mine. Help please. Serious answers only.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm afraid I have bad news for you and your boyfriend. The type of herpes infection you have is herpes simplex virus type 1, or HSV-1. This is also known as oral herpes and orofacial herpes. Herpes simplex virus type 2, or HSV-2, is genital herpes. Both are most contagious and most easily transmitted when lesions are present. "Cold sore" and "fever blister" are euphemisms for herpes lesion. We all know that colds don't cause sores nor do fever cause blisters. So let's call it what it is without trying to pretty it up.

      Types 1 & 2 are two different viruses and each has a preferred site of infection. Type 2 prefers the genitalia. Type 1 prefers the mouth, inside or outside, the face, the nasal passages and the eyes. But either can be transferred to the preferred site of the other. HSV-1 can be transferred from the face/mouth, etc. to the genitals and HSV-2 can be transferred to the face/mouth, etc.

      It's possible that your boyfriend transferred HSV-1 to himself, if he doesn't already have it, when he kissed you and then transferred it to your genitals. Not everyone with either form of herpes has symptoms. This is called being asymptomatic. He should watch for symptoms. If they appear, it should be in a day or two. You watch for genital symptoms. You need to have a serious discussion with him about his judgement. It's one thing for him to willingly expose himself but he had no right to expose you. You have every right to be angry and you should be but if you'd been more assertive and had taken control of the situation, this might not have happened.

  25. QUESTION:
    Is it true that men with bad teeth are better in bed?

    I heard this in the movie 'The Syrian Bride' When the dentist told one of her patients that.

    • ANSWER:
      most cases (85–90%), bad breath originates in the mouth itself. The intensity of bad breath differs during the day, due to eating certain foods (such as garlic, onions, meat, fish, and cheese), obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption.Since the mouth is exposed to less oxygen and is inactive during the night, the odor is usually worse upon awakening ("morning breath"). Bad breath may be transient, often disappearing following eating, brushing one's teeth, flossing, or rinsing with specialized mouthwash.

      Cause's
      1. Tongue
      The most common location is the tongue. Tongue bacteria produce malodorous compounds and fatty acids, and account for 80 to 90 percent of all cases of mouth-related bad breath
      Cleaning the tongue
      The most widely-known reason to clean the tongue is for the control of bad breath. Methods used against bad breath, such as mints, mouth sprays, mouthwash or gum, may only temporarily mask the odors created by the bacteria on the tongue, but cannot cure bad breath because they do not remove the source of the bad breath. In order to prevent the production of the sulfur-containing compounds mentioned above, the bacteria on the tongue must be removed, as must the decaying food debris present on the rear areas of the tongue. Most people who clean their tongue use a tongue cleaner (tongue scraper), or a toothbrush.

      2.Mouth
      There are over 600 types of bacteria found in the average mouth.
      Other parts of the mouth may also contribute to the overall odor, but are not as common as the back of the tongue. These locations are, in order of descending prevalence: inter-dental and sub-gingival niches, faulty dental work, food-impaction areas in between the teeth, abscesses, and unclean dentures.Oral based lesions caused by viral infections like Herpes Simplex and HPV may also contribute to bad breath.

      3.Gum disease
      Advanced periodontal disease is a common cause. Waste products from the anaerobic bacteria growing below the gumline (subgingival) have a foul smell and have been clinically demonstrated to produce a very intense bad breath. Removal of the . tartar or hard plaqueand friable tissue has been shown to improve mouth odor considerably.

      4.Nose
      In this occurrence, the air exiting the nostrils has a pungent odor that differs from the oral odor. Nasal odor may be due to sinus infections or foreign bodies.

      5.Tonsils
      small bits of calcified matter in tonsillar crypts called tonsilloliths that smell extremely foul when released and can cause bad breath.

      6.Stomach
      very uncommon source of bad breath. The esophagus is a closed and collapsed tube, and continuous flow (as opposed to a simple burp) of gas or putrid substances from the stomach indicates a health problem—such as reflux serious enough to be bringing up stomach contents or a fistula between the stomach and the esophagus—which will demonstrate more serious manifestations than just foul odor.

      7.Systemic diseases
      1. Fetor hepaticus: an example of a rare type of bad breath caused by chronic liver failure.
      2. Lower respiratory tract infections (bronchial and lung infections).
      3. Renal infections and renal failure.
      4. Carcinoma.
      5. Diabetes mellitus.

      Management

      1. Gently cleaning the tongue surface twice daily is the most effective way to keep bad breath in control; that can be achieved using a tooth brush, tongue cleaner or tongue brush/scraper to wipe off the bacterial biofilm, debris, and mucus. Scraping or otherwise damaging the tongue should be avoided, and scraping of the V-shaped row of taste buds found at the extreme back of the tongue should also be avoided. Brushing a small amount of antibacterial mouth rinse or tongue gel onto the tongue surface will further inhibit bacterial action.

      2. Eating a healthy breakfast with rough foods helps clean the very back of the tongue.

      3. Chewing gum: Since dry-mouth can increase bacterial buildup and cause or worsen bad breath, chewing sugarless gum can help with the production of saliva, and thereby help to reduce bad breath. Chewing may help particularly when the mouth is dry, or when one cannot perform oral hygiene procedures after meals.

      4. Gargling right before bedtime with an effective mouthwash.

      5. Maintaining proper oral hygiene, including daily tongue cleaning, brushing, flossing, and periodic visits to dentists and hygienists. Flossing is particularly important in removing rotting food debris and bacterial plaque from between the teeth, especially at the gum line.

      Mouthwashes

      Mouthwashes often contain antibacterial agents including cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorhexidine (which can cause temporary staining of the teeth), zinc gluconate, essential oils, and chlorine dioxide. Zinc and chlorhexidine provide strong synergistic effect. They may also contain alcohol, which is a drying agent.

      Thanks,

  26. QUESTION:
    Can a vaginal swab detect herpes?
    I was wondering if a swab, collected from the vagina, can definitively detect genital herpes, even if the patient is not displaying symptoms? Also, what is the best method to ask for from a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      Not reliable--at all.

      A swab of a herpes sore or lesion must be taken 24-48 hours at the time of the outbreak--or the results are not reliable. A false negative for herpes will result once it is past that time frame, making you think you are not infected, when you actually are.

      The IGG type-specific herpes blood test is the standard for detecting a herpes infection. The good part is it detects both Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1/oral herpes/cold sores) as well as HSV-2 (genital herpes). (Testing frame is crucial. The test is generally taken 4 months following the suspected infection to get the most accurate result. If it is taken before that time, a FALSE NEGATIVE is likely to occur, because the blood does not yet show the antibodies indicating the infection.)

      However, HSV-1 is not restricted to the mouth--it is often passed to the genitals via oral sex. HSV-2 is rarely transmitted to the mouth.

      So if the doctor says that your IGG blood test positive for HSV-1 (but not HSV-2), and you are having outbreaks in the genital area, it is likely that is where the infection has taken place--not the mouth.

  27. QUESTION:
    I have a nasty blistery coldsore on the side of my lip should i go to school tomorrow?
    i think its really gross idk if my mom would let me stay but sould i stay ivebeen havin a cold for like the past 2 weeks its mostly gone now should stil stay i dont want my boyfriend to see me with this nasty cold sore by my mouth plz help ? wat should i do to make it go away fast?????? plz plz plz plz plz plz help !!!

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, there's really no medical reason why you should stay home. I can understand that you want your boyfriend to see you at your best but sometimes that just doesn't happen. There's no reason to hide this from him. Besides, you're exposing him to this virus so he has a right to know. Would you turn your back on him if the situation were reversed? Don't sell him short.

      Above all, don't share with anyone things that touch your lips or go inside your mouth even between outbreaks. I hope you realize that what you call a cold sore is a herpes lesion and it means you have herpes simplex virus type 1. I don't think there's anything that can erase a herpes lesion overnight.

  28. QUESTION:
    How do cold sores form? Why do we have them?
    I usually get canker sores a lot, because I used to have braces. But now I have a cold sore on the end of my mouth and it hurts! I hate it. How did it get there? Why do people get them?
    Well actually, i don't know if it's a cold sore, but its at the end of my mouth so i don't know.

    • ANSWER:
      Cold sores — also called fever blisters — are quite different from canker sores, a condition people sometimes associate with cold sores
      Certain strains of the herpes virus cause cold sores. Herpes simplex virus type 1 usually causes cold sores. Herpes simplex virus type 2 is usually responsible for genital herpes. However, either type of the virus can cause sores in the facial area or on the genitals. You get the first episode of herpes infection from another person who has an active lesion. Shared eating utensils, razors and towels may spread this infection
      Cold sores generally clear up without treatment in seven to 10 days. Topical symptomatic treatments such as topical lidocaine or benzyl alcohol (Zilactin) may help relieve symptoms.

  29. QUESTION:
    My doctor says that 90% of people who have had sex have some form of herpes. Is that true?
    That really sounds like an inflated statistic to me, but I'd like to know if it's reliable or not. Has anyone else heard this number? Do you know of a source to cite it?
    Right, but both Simplex I and Simplex II are kinds of herpes. I understand he's combining both. But is THAT true?

    • ANSWER:
      yup i just recently looked it up. i do not know the cite but i made a copy. here it is. Sorry so long.

      Herpes
      Basics
      Herpes is a common viral disease characterized by painful blisters of the mouth or genitals. The herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes painful blisters, usually affecting the mouth or genital area. The anal region, eyes, and fingers are involved in some people. Herpes is a lifelong disease with no cure, but most infected people have long periods without symptoms, interrupted by only occasional outbreaks. While it is a minor, annoying problem for most people, it can be a serious disease for newborns, pregnant women, and those with immune disorders.
      Severe and even fatal forms of herpes, with generalized disease and nervous system involvement, can develop in newborns or in those with immune deficiencies (such as those with AIDS or certain cancers). In rare instances, women who acquire genital herpes for the first time in late pregnancy may have a severe disease course. Antiviral medications are available that can moderate symptoms and reduce the death rate in these most serious cases.
      Causes
      Herpes is caused by either of two viruses that are transmitted by direct contact. Once established, the virus remains dormant in the body, and activates during times of stress. Herpes is caused by two types of herpes simplex virus (HSV): HSV-type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-type 2 (HSV-2). Either virus can cause blisters in the mouth or genital region, but HSV-2 typically affects the genitals, whereas HSV-1 most commonly affects the mouth.
      HSV enters the body through a mucous membrane or a small opening in the skin as a result of direct contact (i.e., through touching, kissing, and vaginal, oral, or anal sexual activity). Although the virus is most contagious through direct contact with herpes sores, it can also be transmitted through saliva, or through skin contact with people who have no visible sores or other symptoms.
      After the primary infection, the herpes virus travels along the nerves and becomes dormant within nerve cells. The virus is reactivated during times of stress, and travels back out through the same pathway, causing characteristic recurring crops of blisters.
      Symptoms
      Oftentimes people do not know they have a herpes infection. Herpes is usually a mild infection. Some people are unaware of any symptoms, and others may mistake minor symptoms for an insect bite or rash.
      The primary episode of either genital or oral herpes often causes painful blisters and flulike symptoms [Table 1]. Symptoms of an initial herpes outbreak generally occur within two weeks after infection, and are usually more severe than subsequent recurrences. One or two crops of blisters may develop, sometimes accompanied by fever, swollen lymph nodes, and in the case of oral herpes, sores within the throat or mouth. A first outbreak of genital herpes may also involve symptoms of meningitis (headache, fever, and light avoidance) lasting for up to one week.
      Genital herpes is characterized by periodic outbreaks of painful genital blisters [Figure 1]. Blisters are often preceded by a painful or tingling sensation, which is known as the prodrome (or prodromal period). Within days, clusters of blisters appear, typically on the penis or vulva, but they can also occur elsewhere, such as on the thighs or around the anus. If the blisters develop within the urethra, you will experience difficult or painful urination. Women may also develop hidden sores within the vagina or on the cervix, and only notice vaginal discharge. Herpes blisters may join together, and usually develop into open, crusty lesions that are extremely painful and last from one to three weeks.

      Figure 1. Female (A) and Male (B) Genital Herpes Lesions
      Genital herpes blisters appear as clusters, typically on the penis or vulva, but they can also occur elsewhere, such as on the thighs or around the anus. Herpes blisters may join together, and usually develop into painful, open, crusty lesions that last from one to three weeks.
      Four or five outbreaks typically occur in the first year after infection. With time, frequency and severity usually diminish, and the outbreaks may stop completely. Women usually have more severe symptoms than men do.
      Oral herpes involves occasional eruptions of “fever blisters” around the mouth [Figure 2]. Often referred to as “cold sores” or “fever blisters,” characteristic herpes lesions often appear around the mouth at times of illness, after sun or wind exposure, during menstruation, or with emotional stress. Lesions can occur within the mouth, on the lips, or on the skin around the mouth.

      Figure 2. Oral Herpes Lesions
      Oral herpes lesions often appear around the mouth at times of illness, after sun or wind exposure, during menstruation, or with emotional stress. Lesions can occur within the mouth, on the lips, or on the skin around the mouth.
      Blisters on the fingers or other areas occur less commonly. Sores on the fingers (known as “herpetic whitlows”) and eyes can also develop from touching one’s own or another’s sores. Eye infections can cause severe pain, blurred vision, or puffy, red and itching eyes. Usually only one eye will be involved.
      In rare cases, herpes may affect the central nervous system. A herpes infection that spreads to the central nervous system (herpes encephalitis) is very serious, and must be treated as a medical emergency. If untreated, herpes encephalitis is fatal in 70% of cases. Symptoms of herpes encephalitis include headache, fever, seizures, behavioral changes, and memory loss. Acylovir is the drug of choice for herpes encephalitis, and will be given intravenously in the hospital for 10 days.
      People with immune disorders often have more severe symptoms, and may develop complications in multiple organs. People who have HIV, or who are immunocompromised for other reasons often develop a more severe course of herpes. Recurring blisters, known as chronic herpetic ulcers, may be more frequent, more painful, and more prolonged.
      HSV can also spread and affect multiple organs in people with immune disorders. The esophagus, lung, or liver are frequent sites of involvement. Sores in the esophagus can lead to weight loss, difficult or painful swallowing, or chest pain. Fever and yellowing of the eyes may occur if the liver is affected, and symptoms of pneumonia may be present with lung involvement. More unusual complications may be present in the adrenal glands, joints, and kidneys. Headache, fever, seizures, behavioral changes, and memory loss can develop if the central nervous system becomes involved. Women who acquire a primary herpes infection during late pregnancy can also develop more severe symptoms and complications.
      Infected newborns may develop severe disease. Newborns infected during or shortly after birth may develop the characteristic blisters, redness, pain, or swelling of the eyes, or general severe illness symptoms within several days to six weeks. If the nervous system is affected, your newborn may exhibit seizures, lethargy, or show areas of paralysis. Cases involving severe general illness of the nervous system are serious, and may lead to permanent brain damage or death. Treatment with antiviral therapy can reduce the severity of infection, and has reduced the resulting death rate to 25%.

      Table 1. Symptoms of Herpes Simplex Infection

      Primary infection: genital and oralRecurrent outbreaks: genital and oralEye involvementHerpes encephalitisIn immunocompromised patientsNewborns (to 6 weeks of age)
      Painful blistering sores

      Fever

      Swollen lymph nodes

      Sore throat (oral herpes)

      Headache, light avoidance (genital herpes)Painful, itchy or tingling sensation where blisters will form

      Painful soresRedness

      Pain

      Swelling

      Blurring of visionHeadache

      Fever

      Seizures

      Changes in behavior

      Memory lossSigns of esophagus involvement: pain or difficulty with swallowing

      Signs of hepatitis: yellowing of eyes, fever

      Signs of pneumonitis: cough, chest pain

      Signs of central nervous system involvement: fever, behavior changesSores

      Infected eyes

      Lethargy

      Seizures

      Paralysis

      Risk Factors
      Herpes is often acquired before adulthood. Oral herpes is usually acquired in childhood. By some estimates, 90% of adults in the U.S. have oral herpes by the time they reach their forties.
      Genital herpes, which is transmitted by sexual activity, has increased significantly in the U.S. since the late 1970s. Experts estimate that about one out of four people in the U.S. over the age of 30 are infected with HSV-2. The virus is more easily transmitted to women than men. Rates also correlate with number of sexual partners.
      Having unprotected sex, or having sex with multiple partners, puts you at risk for acquiring HSV. As for any sexually transmitted disease, having unprotected sex or sex with multiple partners, and failing to use safer sex precautions puts you at risk for an HSV infection. Knowing your partner’s health status and using condoms correctly and consistently can help reduce your risk for acquiring HSV.
      Newborn infection is a special risk, particularly if the mother had her first infection in middle or late pregnancy. Infants born to women who developed their first infection during mid to late pregnancy have a much higher risk of developing herpes than those born to mothers with an outbreak from a longstanding infection. The risk of newborn infection is increased in premature births if birth is delayed for a long period after membranes have ruptured. Using scalp monitors to track a fetus’s heartbeat can also increase the likelihood of transmission, as the scalp sometimes becomes punctured while electrodes are being attached. Newborns can also acquire herpes from being handled by someone with oral herpes.
      Diagnosis
      Health care providers can diagnose herpes by physical examination, sampling any sores present, and performing labo

  30. QUESTION:
    I have a BB sized blister on the shaft of my penis. Is it herpes?
    The thing is, it's been about 5 months since i last had sex and i used a condom. It's painful to the touch but im not experiencing any herpes symptoms like burning or itching. Also, this is the first time i ever noticed anything like this and i hear that herpes is present within 12 days of being infected. It's freakin me out. I would go to the doctor but I don't want the folks to find out. All help is greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      It depends. Genital herpes can lie dormant for a long time. Or it can cause an immediate problem. Or you may have never have noticed the blisters before. Go get screened for herpes, both HSV-1 and HSV-2.

      HSV-2 is NOT just below the belt. HSV-1 Is NOT just above the belt. That is a very common mistake that people make. A significant number of new cases of genital herpes are caused by the HSV-1 virus (which most people contract during childhood) and is then spread genitally through oral sex. The virus does NOT know NOR CARE which nerve ganglia cluster it is infecting.

      "The scary part is that most people with genital herpes don't know they have it, and are unaware they may be spreading it to others, says Warren. Many have no symptoms or mistake their symptoms for something else, such as jock itch, insect bites, hemorrhoids, yeast infections, razor burn, or allergies to laundry detergent.

      Genital herpes, a sexually transmitted disease (STD), is an infection caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). HSV is in the same family of viruses that causes chickenpox, shingles and mononucleosis. There are two types of HSV: HSV-1, which infects 80 percent of the U.S. population, usually appears on the lips in cold sores; HSV-2 is usually found in the genital area. However, if a person with HSV-1 oral herpes (cold sores) performs oral sex, it is possible for the partner to get HSV-1 genital herpes. And HSV-2 can infect the mouth through oral sex.

      HSV can cause sores, or lesions, to appear in and around the vaginal area and within the cervix in women, and on the penis and scrotum in men. Both males and females may also get lesions in the urinary tract, around the anal opening, on the buttocks or thighs, and sometimes on other parts of the body."

  31. QUESTION:
    This guy told me that he has this type of herpes that cant be transmit?
    He said that he had herpes since he was born. He said that his type in his mouth and that it can never be transmitted. He said it is only in his blood. Is this true??

    • ANSWER:
      No, don't believe his words. I am an M.D., as well as hold a Ph. D. in Pharmacy. I speak from medical facts that there is no such a thing as the inability for transmission for ANY type of Herpes virus. REGARDLESS whether it's in the mouth or the genitals, the Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) can be transmitted via contact with infectious skin lesions or secretions (namely saliva or other body fluids).

      When there is ANY disruption in the integrity of the body's surface barrier, such as skin or mucous membranes (in your case, it would be the skin lesion of the cold sore), there is a potential for pathogens to enter the body, gain access to susceptible tissues and causes disease. These "disruptions" include any accidental injury resulting in abrasions, burns, or penetrating wounds; medical procedures such as surgery or catheterization; a primary infectious process that produced surface lesions (such as cold sores, chicken pox, or impetigo); or direct inoculation from intravenous drug use or from animal or arthropod bites.

      Herpesviruses are large, encapsulated viruses that have a double-stranded genome. There are 9 types of herpesviruses, categorized into 3 groups. The HSV falls into the NEUROTROPIC ALPHA-GROUP: Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (abbreviated as HSV-1) that is associated with regular cold sores and type 2 (HSV-2) that is associated with genital herpes. Neurotropic means that they grow in neurons and share the ability to maintain disease potential even in the ABSENCE of clinical signs and symptoms.

  32. QUESTION:
    Can I get it from my boyfriend doing that?
    My boyfriend had a cold sore and went down on me. Now i have what looks like cold sores down there. It doesn't hurt except when my panties rub on the area. Is there something I should do (like go to a doctor) or should i let it be alone. Needless to say me and my boyfriend are not doing anything until this is taken care of.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you can get it from your boyfriend doing that...I would go see a doctor just to be safe.

      "Cold sores, on the other hand, are small red blisters that generally affect the mouth and facial areas, but usually appear on the lip and outer edge of the mouth. In contrast to canker sores, cold sores are extremely contagious and are most often caused by the Herpes Simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). More importantly, when oral herpes lesions and/or its contents come into direct contact with the genital area through oral-genital sex, genital herpes most likely will develop."

  33. QUESTION:
    Does anybody have information on skin condition?
    A friend of mines little baby has a skin condition called erythema-multiforme syndrome. He has patches of rashes all over his body. My friend is scared and would like to know if you all have any information.

    • ANSWER:
      Dear Asker!

      Here are some information about erythema multiform.

      Alternative Names:
      Lyell's syndrome; Stevens-Johnson syndrome; Toxic epidermal necrolysis

      Definition

      Erythema multiforme is a skin disorder resulting from an allergic reaction.

      Causes

      Erythema multiforme is a type of hypersensitivity (allergic) reaction that occurs in response to medications, infections, or illness. Medications associated with erythema multiforme include sulfonamides, penicillins, barbiturates, and phenytoin. Associated infections include herpes simplex and mycoplasma infections.

      The exact cause is unknown. The disorder is believed to involve damage to the blood vessels of the skin with subsequent damage to skin tissues. Approximately 90% of erythema multiforme cases are associated with herpes simplex or mycoplasma infections. The disorder occurs primarily in children and young adults.

      Erythema multiforme may become noticeable with a classic skin lesion, with or without systemic (whole body) symptoms. In Stevens-Johnson syndrome, the systemic symptoms are severe and the lesions are extensive, involving multiple body areas, especially the mucous membranes. Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN syndrome, or Lyell's syndrome) involves multiple large blisters (bullae) that coalesce, followed by sloughing of all or most of the skin and mucous membranes.

      Symptoms

      Multiple skin lesions:

      With sudden onset, which may recur
      That may spread
      That may appear as nodule, papule, or macule
      Central lesion surrounded by concentric rings of paleness and redness, also called "target", "iris", or "bull's eye"
      May have vesicles and bullae (blisters of various sizes)
      Located on the legs, arms, palms, hands, or feet
      May involve the face or lips
      Trunk is usually not involved
      Usually symmetrical
      Itching of the skin may be present
      Fever
      General ill feeling
      Joint aches
      Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:
      Vision abnormalities
      Dry eyes
      Bloodshot eyes
      Eye pain
      Eye burning, itching and discharge
      Mouth sores

      Exams and Tests

      The diagnosis is primarily based on the appearance of the skin lesion and its typical symmetrical distribution, especially if there is a history of risk factors or associated diseases.

      There may be a positive Nikolsky's sign.

      A skin lesion biopsy and microscopic examination may be helpful to differentiate erythema multiforme from other disorders. Erythema multiforme may show tissue death and other changes. Microscopic examination of the tissue may also show antibody deposits.

      Treatment

      Treatment goals include control of the underlying causes or illnesses, treatment of the symptoms, and prevention of infection. Suspected medications should be discontinued.

      Treatment of mild symptoms may include:

      Moist compresses applied to skin lesions
      Medications such as antihistamines to control itching
      Over-the-counter medications (such as acetaminophen) to reduce fever and discomfort
      Topical anesthetics (especially for mouth lesions) to ease discomfort that interferes with eating and drinking
      Treatment of severe symptoms may include:

      Hospitalization and treatment in an intensive care or burn care unit for severe cases, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis
      Systemic corticosteroids to control inflammation
      Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) to stop the process
      Antibiotics to control secondary skin infections
      Good hygiene and isolation from others may be required to prevent secondary infections.

      Extensive skin involvement may cause the loss of large quantities of body fluids, causing shock in addition to the risk of infection. Intensive care with support of body systems may be required.

      Skin grafting may be helpful in cases in which large areas of the body are affected.

      In cases that are caused by the herpes virus, daily antiviral medications may be prescribed to prevent recurrences of erythema multiforme.

      Outlook (Prognosis)

      Mild forms of erythema multiforme usually resolve without difficulty in 2 - 6 weeks, but they may recur. More severe forms may be difficult to treat. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are associated with high death rates.

      Possible Complications

      Permanent skin damage and scarring
      Occasionally, lesions on internal organs causing:
      Pneumonitis (lung inflammation)
      Myocarditis (heart inflammation)
      Nephritis (kidney inflammation)
      Hepatitis (liver inflammation)
      Secondary skin infection (cellulitis)
      Systemic infection, sepsis
      Loss of body fluids, shock

      When to Contact a Medical Professional

      Go to the emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911) if symptoms indicate erythema multiforme. Involvement of a large area of the body is an emergency situation

      Hope that may help you!
      Good luck!

  34. QUESTION:
    Where all can you get herpes?
    i know forsure on the vaginal area, testicals & penis, and mouth. i was also reading you can get them in your eyes. ouch. but if you have them on your vaginal area, can bumbs/blisters be in the inside of your thighs an inch or two down from you vagina or penis. no worries about me. i have a concerned family member.

    • ANSWER:
      ROFLMAO @ Ozgood!

      Herpes lives inside your WHOLE body... FOREVER.

      Herpes of the eye (Herpetic keratoconjunctivitis): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpetic_keratoconjunctivitis

      Herpes on the finger (herpetic whitlow): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpetic_whitlow

      Herpes of the hair follicle (Herpetic sycosis): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpetic_sycosis

      Herpes INSIDE the mouth ie. cheeks and gums (herpetic gingivostomatitis). It causes bad breath and a mouth so sore that you don't want to eat: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001052.htmhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpetic_gingivostomatitis

      2 types of brain herpes (Herpes Encephalitis and Herpes meningitis). Encephalitis is swelling of the brain. People with this have decreased level of consciousness, are confused, and changes in personality: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpes_encephalitis Menangitis is inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpesviral_meningitis

      Herpes of the face, ears, and neck (Herpes gladiatorum), also known as HSV-I. Symptoms include fever, headache, sore throat and swollen glands.

      Ramsay Hunt syndrome type II (RHS-2) , which affects the movements of facial muscles, the touch sensation of a part of ear and ear canal, the taste function of the frontal two-thirds of the tongue, and the moisturization of the eyes and the mouth. Basically, it's a weakness of the muscles activated by the facial nerve. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpes_zoster_oticus

      And not only can affect you, but there's also Neonatal herpes simplex, which affects babies: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neonatal_herpes_simplex and can even cause a developmental disorder in an embryo called Herpetic Embriopothy.

      People who have eczema can have herpes spread all throughout the eczematous areas http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eczema_herpeticum

      And if someone has a comprimised immune system (ie. AIDS), herpes can cause unusual lesions in the skin, some with the appearance of a knife cut http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpes#cite_note-7.

      Apparantly, it even causes Alzheimer's disease http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpes#cite_note-16

      And there is even a single report of a systemic infection with HSV-2, where a healthy 28-year old woman with a healthy immune system died 12 days after contracting the virus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpes#cite_note-Southern_Medical_Journal_Jan_1983-3

      So if that isn't enough reason to WEAR A CONDOM, then I don't know what is!

      NO GLOVE = NO LOVE!!!

  35. QUESTION:
    Where exactly do herpes simplex exist in the body and how does it reproduce?

    • ANSWER:
      Genital herpes is a contagious viral infection that affects an estimated 45 million Americans (more than one in five). Each year, as many as 1 million new cases are believed to occur. The infection is caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). There are two types of HSV and both can cause the symptoms of genital herpes. HSV type 1 most commonly causes sores on the lips (known as fever blisters or cold sores), but it can cause genital infections as well. HSV type 2 most often causes genital sores, but it also can infect the mouth. The virus remains in certain nerve cells of the body for life, causing periodic symptoms in some people. Many people who are infected with HSV never develop any symptoms.

      How is genital herpes transmitted?
      The infection is usually acquired by sexual contact with someone who has genital herpes. People with oral herpes can transmit the infection to the genital area of a partner during oral-genital sex. Herpes infections also can be transmitted by a person who is infected with HSV but has no noticeable symptoms. Such asymptomatic shedding of the virus may be fairly common, occurring from 5 percent to 20 percent of the time in infected individuals.

      What are the symptoms of genital herpes?
      Symptoms of a primary episode of genital herpes vary widely from person to person. They usually occur within two to 10 days of exposure and typically involve small red bumps that may develop into blisters and open lesions. These “bumps” appear at the site of infection, which may be in or around the vaginal area, the cervix, the penis, urinary tract of both men and women, and around the anal opening, buttocks or thighs. Sores also may appear on other parts of the body where broken skin has come into contact with HSV. Over a period of days, the sores become encrusted and then heal without scarring.

      Other symptoms of a primary episode of genital herpes may include fever, headache, muscle aches, swollen glands in the groin area, painful urination or vaginal discharge.

      Can genital herpes reoccur?
      After invading the skin or mucous membranes, the virus that causes genital herpes travels to the sensory nerves at the end of the spinal cord. Even after the skin lesions have disappeared, the virus remains inside the nerve cells in a latent state. In most people, the virus reactivates from time to time. When this happens, the virus travels along the nerves to the skin, where it multiplies on the surface at or near the site of the original herpes sores, causing new lesions to erupt. It also can reactivate without any visible sores. At these times, small amounts of the virus may be shed at, or near, sites of the original infection, in genital or oral secretions, or from inapparent lesions. This shedding is infrequent, but it is sufficient to infect a sex partner.

      The symptoms of recurrent episodes are usually milder than those of the first episode and typically last about a week. A recurrent outbreak may be signaled by a tingling sensation or itching in the genital area or pain in the buttocks or down the leg. These are called prodromal symptoms and, for some people, they can be the most painful and annoying part of a recurrent episode. Sometimes no visible sores develop. At other times, blisters appear that may be very small and barely noticeable or may break into open sores that crust over and then disappear. The frequency and severity of the recurrent episodes vary greatly. While some people recognize only one or two recurrences in a lifetime, others may experience several outbreaks a year. The number and pattern of recurrences often change over time for an individual. Scientists do not know what causes the virus to reactivate. Although some people with herpes report that their recurrences are brought on by other illness, stress exposure to sunlight or menstruation, recurrences often are not predictable.

      How is genital herpes diagnosed?
      The sores of genital herpes in its active stage are usually visible to the naked eye. Several laboratory tests may be needed, however, to distinguish herpes sores from other infections. The most accurate method of diagnosis is by viral culture. A blood test can detect antibodies to the virus, which indicate that the person has at some time been infected with HSV, but it cannot determine whether a person has an active genital herpes infection. During an active herpes episode, whether primary or recurrent, it is important to follow a few simple steps to speed healing and to avoid spreading the infection to other sites of the body or to other people:

      Keep the infected area clean and dry to prevent secondary infection from developing.

      Try to avoid touching the sores; wash hands after contact with the sores.

      Avoid sexual contact from the time symptoms are first recognized until the sores are completely healed, that is, until scabs have fallen off and new skin has formed over the site of the lesion.
      Oral acyclovir markedly shortens the course

  36. QUESTION:
    How is herpes spread and what are symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Genital herpes is a contagious viral infection that affects an estimated 45 million Americans. To place this in a broader more mentally visible picture, genital herpes is affecting as many as one in every four people who are sexually active. There are an estimated 1 million new cases each year that are believed to occur. Genital herpes is caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV).

      There are two types of HSV and both can cause the herpes symptoms. HSV type 1 most commonly causes sores on the lips and is often referred to as fever blisters or cold sores, but it can cause symptoms of genital herpes infections as well. HSV type 2 is most often related to infections and symptoms of genital herpes, but it also can infect the mouth. The virus remains in certain nerve cells of the body for life, causing periodic symptoms of genital herpes in some people. Many people who are infected with HSV never develop any symptoms of genital herpes at all.

      The infection is usually acquired by sexual contact with someone who has symptoms of genital herpes. People with oral herpes can transmit the infection to the genital area of a partner during oral-genital sex and result in symptoms of genital herpes. A person who is infected with HSV but has no noticeable symptoms of genital herpes can also transmit herpes infections. Such asymptomatic shedding of the virus may be fairly common, occurring from 5 percent to 20 percent of the time in infected individuals.

      Symptoms of genital herpes in a primary episode vary widely from person to person. They usually occur within two to 10 days of exposure. Typically the symptoms associated with genital herpes that are recognizable involve small red bumps that may develop into blisters and open lesions. These “bumps” appear at the site of infection, which may be in or around the vaginal area, the cervix, the penis, urinary tract of both men and women, and around the anal opening, buttocks or thighs. Sores also may appear on other parts of the body where broken skin has come into contact with HSV. Over a period of days, the sores become encrusted and then heal without scarring. Symptoms associated with genital herpes in a primary outbreak tend to take longer to heal because the body has yet to build up an immune system resistance to the viral outbreaks.

      Other herpes symptoms in a primary episode may include fever, headache, muscle aches, and swollen glands in the groin area, painful urination or vaginal discharge.

      Some of the most common symptoms of genital herpes that are often misdiagnosed are misdiagnosed as yeast infection, insect bites, jock itch, urinary tract infections, abrasions or razor burn, ingrown hair follicles, and even hemorrhoids. If you suffer from recurring infections or symptoms of any of the listed conditions, it is advised to see a medical professional for observance and testing when symptoms occur. It is quite possible the recurrence of such conditions could actually be symptoms of genital herpes.

      It is never safe to assume that condoms will protect you from a herpes infection and prevent you from ever knowing what symptoms of genital herpes really are. Condoms do not cover herpes infected areas in many of those infected with the herpes virus. The best way to protect yourself from every knowing symptoms of genital herpes is to practice abstinence. Getting to know your partner, engaging in proper STD testing prior to intimacies and being as completely honest and forthright as possible is the most assured way to combat a future infection.

      With so many people who are infected with the herpes virus never showing any symptoms of genital herpes, the increase for proper testing is recognized and strongly encouraged.

      If you are a person that suffers from symptoms of genital herpes, there are a number of treatment options available. Antivirals are available by prescription from your health care provider and a number of over-the-counter treatments are available and are affective in treating symptoms of genital herpes. One such

  37. QUESTION:
    Can you get pimples on your penis?
    Lately I've seen some small white dots on my penis. There at the bottom of it so I just wanted to know if it was normal or not. Thanks for answering.

    • ANSWER:
      Herpes may play a role in the spread of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Herpes sores can make it easier for HIV to get into your body. Herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous, host-adapted pathogens that cause a wide variety of disease states. Two types exist: herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2). Herpes simplex type 1 virus is responsible for systemic infections involving the liver and other organs, including the central nervous system, and localized infections may involve the skin, eyes and mouth. In children this is typified by fever, irritability and enanthem of the gingiva and mucous membranes of the mouth.

      Herpes can make people more susceptible to HIV infection. Likewise, it can make HIV-infected individuals more infectious. Herpes can also be spread from one place on your body to another, such as from your genitals to your fingers, then to your eyes or to other parts of your body. Herpes can also be spread from a mother to her baby when she gives birth. Herpes simplex features as groups of painful blisters or sores caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) on people's skin. It can happen on all parts of the skin but mostly are found around the peri-oral and peri-genital areas, depends on the infected HSV type.

      Treatment of the infection will depend on its severity. Mild infection is typically treated with topical and sometimes oral antiviral medication. Treatment with acyclovir did not reduce this long-lasting, high concentration of HSV-2-specific CD4+ T cells at the sites of healed herpes lesions.

      Genital herpes should be diagnosed professionally. Many people with genital herpes do not seek treatment because they are asymptomatic. In other words, have mild symptoms and do not realize that anything is wrong. This causes a large proportion of global burden of ill-health because in the end only a small proportion of people may look for advice and avoid re-infection. Mostly people have a single mild attack but in some persons repeated herpes attack occur and this is a very serious problem for them and they must undergo STD testing.

  38. QUESTION:
    what happen if you contact Syphilis and herpes?
    could anybody explain these to me in simple english?

    • ANSWER:
      Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). it can be contracted through close sexual contact.

      The first stage of syphilis is contagious and occurs three to six days after contact.

      Lesions show where the skin has been in contact with the bacteria. The lesions appear as painless red sores (chancre) and are often seen on the penis or the labia or inside the vagina itself.

      Lesions can also be found in the rectum after anal sex, or in the mouth after oral sex. The lesions will usually disappear after a few weeks.

      The second stage is contagious and occurs around six weeks or more after the chancre appears. A rash may appear on the body with small red scaly bumps; this may be followed by flu-like symptoms such as fever and aching muscles. The symptoms disappear but may return at any time.

      The third stage of syphilis is non-contagious and may appear years after stages one and two. Serious symptoms affect different parts of the body. The main artery and the heart are damaged and there are changes in the nervous system and the brain, which can give rise to: mental deterioration, sexual impotence, loss of balance and loss of feeling or shooting pains in the legs.

      What is genital herpes?

      Genital herpes is a contagious disease caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), which infects the skin and mucous membranes of the genitals and around the rectum. It is transmitted by physical and sexual contact.

      Herpes appears as redness and small watery blisters on the genitals. It may be accompanied by pain, itching and burning. The blisters will burst and turn into small ulcers, which will heal after two to three weeks without scarring.

      The first eruption of herpes will appear four to seven days after the time of infection. The first sign is an uncomfortable prickly and piercing sensation. This will be followed after a couple of hours or up to two days later by small blisters on the skin. The blisters will turn into small ulcers in two to three weeks.

      The first outbreak of genital herpes will cause the most noticeable symptoms. Some people will have very weak symptoms or none at all. Others will experience fever, muscular pains and headaches along with a burning and itching pain in the genitals and around the rectum.

      There can be considerable discomfort on passing urine, which patients describe as feeling different to cystitis (bladder infection).

      Recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes will typically be milder than the first.

      Practise safe sex - use a condom.
      If you are in doubt please contact your doctor who will test and treat you and any recent partner.

  39. QUESTION:
    What is the medical definitions of herpes simplex?
    some people have this disease

    • ANSWER:
      Herpes simplex (from the Greek ἕρπης /΄erpis/, "snake") is a viral disease caused by both herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2). Infection with the herpes virus is categorized into one of several distinct disorders based on the site of infection. Oral herpes, the visible symptoms of which are colloquially called cold sores, infects the face and mouth. Oral herpes is the most common form of infection. Genital herpes, commonly known simply as herpes, is the second most common form of herpes. Other disorders such as herpetic whitlow, herpes gladiatorum, ocular herpes (keratitis), cerebral herpes infection encephalitis, Mollaret's meningitis, neonatal herpes, and possibly Bell's palsy are all caused by herpes simplex viruses.

      Herpes viruses cycle between periods of active disease—presenting as blisters containing infectious virus particles—that last 2–21 days, followed by a remission period, during which the sores disappear. Genital herpes, however, is often asymptomatic, though viral shedding may still occur. After initial infection, the viruses move to sensory nerves, where they reside as life-long, latent viruses. Causes of recurrence are uncertain, though some potential triggers have been identified. Over time, episodes of active disease reduce in frequency and severity.

      Herpes simplex is most easily transmitted by direct contact with a lesion or the body fluid of an infected individual. Transmission may also occur through skin-to-skin contact during periods of asymptomatic shedding. Barrier protection methods are the most reliable method of preventing transmission of herpes, but they merely reduce rather than eliminate risk. Oral herpes is easily diagnosed if the patient presents with visible sores or ulcers. Early stages of orofacial herpes and genital herpes are harder to diagnose; laboratory testing is usually required. 20% of the U.S. population has antibodies to HSV-2, although not all of them have a history of genital lesions.[1]

      There is no cure for herpes. Once infected, the virus remains in the body for life. However, after several years, some people will become perpetually asymptomatic and will no longer experience outbreaks, though they may still be contagious to others. Vaccines are in clinical trials but have not demonstrated effectiveness. Treatments can reduce viral reproduction and shedding, prevent the virus from entering the skin, and alleviate the severity of symptomatic episodes.

      Herpes simplex should not be confused with conditions caused by other viruses in the herpesviridae family such as herpes zoster, which is a viral disease caused by varicella zoster virus. There is also a possibility of confusion with "hand, foot and mouth disease" due to apparition of lesions on the skin.

  40. QUESTION:
    yuck bad breath in mourning how do i get rid of it?
    It just happens cuase it wants to it smells like air..
    the smell is under my tooth how do i get rid of it?
    ps brushing my teeth dosent work i tryed it 5 times a day it still haunts me in tha mourning..
    I dont smoke or do any of that stuff im 15.. anyone can be not doing at this age ps i dont drink earthur...

    • ANSWER:
      Most cases (85–90%), bad breath originates in the mouth itself. The intensity of bad breath differs during the day, due to eating certain foods (such as garlic, onions, meat, fish, and cheese), obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption.Since the mouth is exposed to less oxygen and is inactive during the night, the odor is usually worse upon awakening ("morning breath"). Bad breath may be transient, often disappearing following eating, brushing one's teeth, flossing, or rinsing with specialized mouthwash.

      Cause's
      1. Tongue
      The most common location is the tongue. Tongue bacteria produce malodorous compounds and fatty acids, and account for 80 to 90 percent of all cases of mouth-related bad breath
      Cleaning the tongue
      The most widely-known reason to clean the tongue is for the control of bad breath. Methods used against bad breath, such as mints, mouth sprays, mouthwash or gum, may only temporarily mask the odors created by the bacteria on the tongue, but cannot cure bad breath because they do not remove the source of the bad breath. In order to prevent the production of the sulfur-containing compounds mentioned above, the bacteria on the tongue must be removed, as must the decaying food debris present on the rear areas of the tongue. Most people who clean their tongue use a tongue cleaner (tongue scraper), or a toothbrush.

      2.Mouth
      There are over 600 types of bacteria found in the average mouth.
      Other parts of the mouth may also contribute to the overall odor, but are not as common as the back of the tongue. These locations are, in order of descending prevalence: inter-dental and sub-gingival niches, faulty dental work, food-impaction areas in between the teeth, abscesses, and unclean dentures.Oral based lesions caused by viral infections like Herpes Simplex and HPV may also contribute to bad breath.

      3.Gum disease
      Advanced periodontal disease is a common cause. Waste products from the anaerobic bacteria growing below the gumline (subgingival) have a foul smell and have been clinically demonstrated to produce a very intense bad breath. Removal of the . tartar or hard plaqueand friable tissue has been shown to improve mouth odor considerably.

      4.Nose
      In this occurrence, the air exiting the nostrils has a pungent odor that differs from the oral odor. Nasal odor may be due to sinus infections or foreign bodies.

      5.Tonsils
      small bits of calcified matter in tonsillar crypts called tonsilloliths that smell extremely foul when released and can cause bad breath.

      6.Stomach
      very uncommon source of bad breath. The esophagus is a closed and collapsed tube, and continuous flow (as opposed to a simple burp) of gas or putrid substances from the stomach indicates a health problem—such as reflux serious enough to be bringing up stomach contents or a fistula between the stomach and the esophagus—which will demonstrate more serious manifestations than just foul odor.

      7.Systemic diseases
      1. Fetor hepaticus: an example of a rare type of bad breath caused by chronic liver failure.
      2. Lower respiratory tract infections (bronchial and lung infections).
      3. Renal infections and renal failure.
      4. Carcinoma.
      5. Diabetes mellitus.

      Management

      1. Gently cleaning the tongue surface twice daily is the most effective way to keep bad breath in control; that can be achieved using a tooth brush, tongue cleaner or tongue brush/scraper to wipe off the bacterial biofilm, debris, and mucus. Scraping or otherwise damaging the tongue should be avoided, and scraping of the V-shaped row of taste buds found at the extreme back of the tongue should also be avoided. Brushing a small amount of antibacterial mouth rinse or tongue gel onto the tongue surface will further inhibit bacterial action.

      2. Eating a healthy breakfast with rough foods helps clean the very back of the tongue.

      3. Chewing gum: Since dry-mouth can increase bacterial buildup and cause or worsen bad breath, chewing sugarless gum can help with the production of saliva, and thereby help to reduce bad breath. Chewing may help particularly when the mouth is dry, or when one cannot perform oral hygiene procedures after meals.

      4. Gargling right before bedtime with an effective mouthwash.

      5. Maintaining proper oral hygiene, including daily tongue cleaning, brushing, flossing, and periodic visits to dentists and hygienists. Flossing is particularly important in removing rotting food debris and bacterial plaque from between the teeth, especially at the gumline.

      Mouthwashes

      Mouthwashes often contain antibacterial agents including cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorhexidine (which can cause temporary staining of the teeth), zinc gluconate, essential oils, and chlorine dioxide. Zinc and chlorhexidine provide strong synergistic effect. They may also contain alcohol, which is a drying agent.

      Thanks,

  41. QUESTION:
    What are the signs for herpies?
    My husband that I have been with for two years just found out that his ex wife has herpies. She has had it for two years and didn't tell know one till now. I just had a pap smear done March 31, 2006. Would it of shown up if I had it? I am very scared and very upset that she didn't tell us till now. I want to know all I can about herpies.
    I have never had any signs like that and neither has my husband.
    Can children catch it from parents cause he has two girls with her and i have three of my own?
    I am going to get tested tomorrow at the health department that i am at. But I am very scared and I have never had anything like that in my whole life. I am 24 years old and only had two partners. I am very careful.
    What do they look like when you have an outbreak and one person answered and said if you get hot down there you are in trouble What does that mean?
    thank you all You have helped me soo much. I found some sites that also helped and thank you Jack .
    to one answer that i have received my husbands ex wife has known for two years that she has had the herpes and never told us i think that is wrong and i am very upset with her

    • ANSWER:
      There are two strains of the herpes virus: Herpes Simplex Type 1 and Herpes Simplex Type 2. Herpes Simplex 1 is responsible for oral herpes, more commonly known as cold sores, which generally show up on or around the mouth. Herpes Simplex 2 is responsible for genital herpes and is considered to be a sexually transmitted disease.
      When Will the Symptoms of Herpes Appear?
      Once you have been exposed to the virus through direct skin-to-skin contact, it can take anywhere from two to 20 days before your first episode of symptoms of genital herpes will occur. While the first outbreak of herpes is usually the worst one you will experience, as much as 60% of those infected with the virus will fail to notice any symptoms because the outbreak is so mild. Even if you do not have any symptoms, though, you can still pass on the virus to your sexual partners.

      On average, the first herpes outbreak in men lasts about two weeks while in women the average is three weeks. Additionally, because women frequently experience their herpes sores in the vagina, many may mistake the few herpes symptoms they have for some other type of infection. You may confuse herpes with an outbreak of boils. Boils are larger and more painful, but a variety of boil treatments are available. It is not uncommon for a woman infected with the herpes virus to be misdiagnosed with a yeast infection, pelvic inflammatory disease or an inflamed cervix (cervicitis). While women frequently develop vaginal herpes, it is also possible to develop lesions on the vulva, cervix, urethra, anus, thighs and buttocks. If you have unusual vaginal discharge or persistent vaginal discomfort, it is a good idea to be tested for herpes.

      Genital Herpes Symptoms
      The most common sign of herpes is red, sensitive skin that develops sores or blisters (often referred to as herpes bumps). These lesions usually show up in and around the genital area, although female symptoms of herpes may cause these blisters to develop inside the vagina. Other signs and symptoms of genital herpes include:

      Swollen lymph glands in the groin
      Headaches
      Muscle aches
      Fever
      Lower back pain
      In women, herpes symptoms can also include vaginal discharge and pain or a burning sensation when urinating. About 25% of women will develop meningitis as a complication of their first herpes outbreak while another 10% to 15% will have troubles urinating because of their herpes.
      Recurrent Herpes Outbreaks
      Of those people who experienced an outbreak of herpes sores when they were first infected, 80% will go on to have recurrent outbreaks. Although these outbreaks tend to be less severe and shorter in duration than the first outbreak, they can still be just as uncomfortable. Additionally, a person is more likely to pass on the virus when they experience an outbreak.

      Prior to the recurrent breakout, though, many individuals tend to experience "warning symptoms" that they are about to have another herpes episode. Often, an individual will have some pain or discomfort in the area that is infected before their herpes sores develop. During this time, you are considered to be very contagious despite the absence of herpes blisters.

      Herpes Treatment
      Although there is no herpes cure, there are various herpes medications available that can ease the discomfort of your symptoms and shorten the length of the herpes outbreak.

  42. QUESTION:
    Why does a cold sore come back?
    I have had cold sores since I was young, but they always seem to happen around this time of year, especially since I am in college and stressed now...I know it's not really stress-related, as that's an old wives tale, but why does a cold sore come back? Why does it lie dormant some years?

    • ANSWER:
      What causes a cold sore? A cold-sore episode is caused by the reactivation of the latent herpes simplex virus. An episode typically lasts ten days or longer and systemic flu-like symptoms often accompany the lip lesions, making a cold sore a physically and emotionally difficult condition. Medical experts have not determined the exact cause for reactivation, and a variety of stimuli, such as stress, illness and weather exposure, can precipitate a cold sore outbreak

      Why are lips prone to cold sores? Lips are transitional tissue and do not contain the natural defense mechanisms endogenous to the skin and the mouth. Lips are naturally dry, have little natural sun protection, are particularly sensitive to dryness and damage, and thus are subject to complications such as carcinomas and cold sores.

      What more can I do to help combat cold sores besides using Pure Lip products? Since cold sores are offset by stress, hormones, and environmental causes, be sure to get plenty of rest, eat a balanced diet, exercise regularly, take vitamins and supplements, and protect your lips from the sun and weather. If you get a cold sore, utilize Advil® or a pain reliever with Ibuprofen to help bring down the swelling.

  43. QUESTION:
    Do people with extremely foul breath not know?
    Some people have such bad breath.I'm not saying it to be insulting but literally poop breath., and they talk straight in your face.do they not notice it or not care.and what causes it cuz even clean people with seemingly good hygiene have the WORST POOP breath.

    • ANSWER:
      Most cases (85–90%), bad breath originates in the mouth itself. The intensity of bad breath differs during the day, due to eating certain foods (such as garlic, onions, meat, fish, and cheese), obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Since the mouth is exposed to less oxygen and is inactive during the night, the odor is usually worse upon awakening ("morning breath"). Bad breath may be transient, often disappearing following eating, brushing one's teeth, flossing, or rinsing with specialized mouthwash.

      Cause's
      1. Tongue
      The most common location is the tongue. Tongue bacteria produce malodorous compounds and fatty acids, and account for 80 to 90 percent of all cases of mouth-related bad breath
      Cleaning the tongue
      The most widely-known reason to clean the tongue is for the control of bad breath. Methods used against bad breath, such as mints, mouth sprays, mouthwash or gum, may only temporarily mask the odors created by the bacteria on the tongue, but cannot cure bad breath because they do not remove the source of the bad breath. In order to prevent the production of the sulfur-containing compounds mentioned above, the bacteria on the tongue must be removed, as must the decaying food debris present on the rear areas of the tongue. Most people who clean their tongue use a tongue cleaner (tongue scraper), or a toothbrush.

      2.Mouth
      There are over 600 types of bacteria found in the average mouth.
      Other parts of the mouth may also contribute to the overall odor, but are not as common as the back of the tongue. These locations are, in order of descending prevalence: inter-dental and sub-gingival niches, faulty dental work, food-impaction areas in between the teeth, abscesses, and unclean dentures.Oral based lesions caused by viral infections like Herpes Simplex and HPV may also contribute to bad breath.

      3.Gum disease
      Advanced periodontal disease is a common cause. Waste products from the anaerobic bacteria growing below the gumline (subgingival) have a foul smell and have been clinically demonstrated to produce a very intense bad breath. Removal of the . tartar or hard plaqueand friable tissue has been shown to improve mouth odor considerably.

      4.Nose
      In this occurrence, the air exiting the nostrils has a pungent odor that differs from the oral odor. Nasal odor may be due to sinus infections or foreign bodies.

      5.Tonsils
      small bits of calcified matter in tonsillar crypts called tonsilloliths that smell extremely foul when released and can cause bad breath.

      6.Stomach
      very uncommon source of bad breath. The esophagus is a closed and collapsed tube, and continuous flow (as opposed to a simple burp) of gas or putrid substances from the stomach indicates a health problem—such as reflux serious enough to be bringing up stomach contents or a fistula between the stomach and the esophagus—which will demonstrate more serious manifestations than just foul odor.

      7.Systemic diseases
      1. Fetor hepaticus: an example of a rare type of bad breath caused by chronic liver failure.
      2. Lower respiratory tract infections (bronchial and lung infections).
      3. Renal infections and renal failure.
      4. Carcinoma.
      5. Diabetes mellitus.

      Management

      1. Gently cleaning the tongue surface twice daily is the most effective way to keep bad breath in control; that can be achieved using a tooth brush, tongue cleaner or tongue brush/scraper to wipe off the bacterial biofilm, debris, and mucus. Scraping or otherwise damaging the tongue should be avoided, and scraping of the V-shaped row of taste buds found at the extreme back of the tongue should also be avoided. Brushing a small amount of antibacterial mouth rinse or tongue gel onto the tongue surface will further inhibit bacterial action.

      2. Eating a healthy breakfast with rough foods helps clean the very back of the tongue.

      3. Chewing gum: Since dry-mouth can increase bacterial buildup and cause or worsen bad breath, chewing sugarless gum can help with the production of saliva, and thereby help to reduce bad breath. Chewing may help particularly when the mouth is dry, or when one cannot perform oral hygiene procedures after meals.

      4. Gargling right before bedtime with an effective mouthwash.

      5. Maintaining proper oral hygiene, including daily tongue cleaning, brushing, flossing, and periodic visits to dentists and hygienists. Flossing is particularly important in removing rotting food debris and bacterial plaque from between the teeth, especially at the gum line.

      Mouthwashes

      Mouthwashes often contain antibacterial agents including cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorhexidine (which can cause temporary staining of the teeth), zinc gluconate, essential oils, and chlorine dioxide. Zinc and chlorhexidine provide strong synergistic effect. They may also contain alcohol, which is a drying agent.

      Thanks,

  44. QUESTION:
    This red bump has been on my lip for as long as I can remember?
    theres a bump on my lips and its been there for soo long. It's kinda in the middle-left of my bottom lip. It kinda mskes my lips look uneven. It's honestly been there for as long as I can remember! therefore, i'm not sure if it weas just an accident or i was born with it....but i saw my pictures from 7 years ago, I don't have them!

    • ANSWER:
      The HSV-1 or herpes simplex virus-1 and the HSV-2 or herpes simplex virus-2 are two forms of herpes that cause genital lesions. The HSV-1 is the one responsible for the blisters in the mouth area and the HSV-2 brings about lesions or genital sores around the anus area. People having suppressed immune systems, as a result of either stress, medications or infection, would normally experience longer and more frequent herpes outbreaks.

  45. QUESTION:
    what are the different types of herpes?
    is there a cure for any type of herpes? what would you do if you were diagnosed with herpes?
    i just need as much info as i can get. thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Formal name: Herpes Simplex Virus, Type1 and Type 2

      Herpes culture; Herpes simplex viral culture; HSV DNA; HSV by PCR; HSV-1 or HSV-2 IgM or IgG; HSV-1; HSV-2; HHV1; HHV2

      Herpes simplex testing is performed to identify an acute herpes infection or to detect herpes antibodies, an indication of a previous exposure to herpes. One of the most common viral infections, herpes simplex virus (HSV) exists as two main types, HSV-1 and HSV-2. Both types are contagious and periodically cause small fever blisters (vesicles) that break to form open lesions. HSV-1 primarily causes blisters or "cold sores" around the oral cavity and mouth, while HSV-2 usually causes lesions around the genital area; however, either one can affect the oral or genital area.
      The herpes simplex virus can be passed from person to person through skin contact while the sores are open and healing and sometimes asymptomatically when there are no visible sores. HSV-2 is frequently a sexually transmitted disease, but HSV-1 also may be acquired during oral sex and found in the genital area.

      When someone is first infected, he or she may have obvious and painful blisters at the site of infection, which usually appear within two weeks after the virus is transmitted and usually heal within two to four weeks. The blisters can appear in the vaginal area, on the penis, around the anus, or on the buttocks or thighs. This primary episode can include a second outbreak of blisters and even flu-like symptoms of fever and swollen glands. However, not everyone develops blisters and sometimes symptoms are so mild that they are unnoticeable or mistaken for something else, such as insect bites or a rash.

      While there is no cure for herpes, antiviral medications are available that suppress outbreaks and shorten the duration of active shedding of virus and of symptoms,

      HSV testing detects either the virus itself, its viral DNA, or antibodies to the virus. During an acute primary infection or reactivation, the virus may be detected by:

      Herpes culture. A sample of fluid is collected from an open sore (the most common sample). It is incubated in a nutrient environment to grow and isolate the virus. This test is sensitive and specific, but it takes 2 or more days to complete. Fresh lesions are the best for this test. Viral shedding decreases over time and can lead to a false negative result. Once the virus is grown in culture, it is possible to determine if it is HSV-1 or HSV-2.
      HSV DNA testing. Can be done to detect HSV genetic material in a patient sample. DNA testing is usually done only if the culture is negative but the physician still suspects herpes or if the patient is being treated for herpes. This method can detect the virus as well as identify the type and is good in circumstances where the virus is present in low numbers (such as viral encephalitis) or if the lesion is several days old. This is the best method to detect HSV meningitis, encephalitis, or keratitis because this method is more sensitive.
      HSV antibody testing. Antibodies to HSV are specific proteins that the body creates and releases into the bloodstream to fight the infection. HSV IgM antibody production begins several days after a primary (initial) HSV infection and may be detectable in the blood for several weeks. HSV IgG antibody production begins after HSV IgM production. Concentrations rise for several weeks, fall, and then stabilize in the blood. Once someone has been infected with HSV, they will continue to produce small quantities of HSV IgG. HSV antibody testing can detect both viral types (HSV-1 and HSV-2), and tests are available that can detect the early IgM antibodies as well as the IgG antibodies that remain forever in those who have been exposed.

  46. QUESTION:
    i have cold sore coming up right above my top lip?
    i need help getting rid of a cold sore and fast, i have a presentation and i don't want this embarrassing thing on my lip!! what can i do at home to quickly stop it from getting worse?

    • ANSWER:
      Many people acquire the herpes virus and never show any signs of having symptoms. For others, painful blisters appear near the area where the virus has entered the body. Typically, the blisters heal completely but reappear at some point in the future when you least expect ,or want, them too. Between attacks, the virus lives deep in the roots of the nerves any lays dormant until something, like stress, triggers another outbreak. When herpes simplex lesions appear in their most common location, around the mouth and lips, people often refer to them as “cold sores” or “fever blisters.”

      Here are some tips that helps me on how to treat cold sore. You can try this.... :)

      Happy new year... :)

  47. QUESTION:
    I have genital herpes, please tell me the best way to get rid of this?

    • ANSWER:
      What is genital herpes?
      Genital herpes is an infection caused by the herpes simplex virus or HSV. There are two types of HSV, and both can cause genital herpes. HSV type 1 most commonly infects the lips, causing sores known as fever blisters or cold sores, but it also can infect the genital area and produce sores. HSV type 2 is the usual cause of genital herpes, but it also can infect the mouth. A person who has genital herpes infection can easily pass or transmit the virus to an uninfected person during sex.

      HSV remains in certain nerve cells of the body for life, and can produce symptoms off and on in some infected people.

      According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 45 million people in the United States ages 12 and older, or 1 out of 5 of the total adolescent and adult population, are infected with HSV-2.

      How does someone get genital herpes?
      Most people get genital herpes by having sex with someone who is having a herpes "outbreak." This outbreak means that HSV is active. When active, the virus usually causes visible lesions in the genital area. The lesions shed (cast off) viruses that can infect another person. A person with genital herpes also can infect a sexual partner during oral sex. The virus is spread only rarely, if at all, by touching objects such as a toilet seat or hot tub.

      Genital Herpes Symptoms
      Unfortunately, most people who have genital herpes don't know it because they never have any symptoms, or they do not recognize any symptoms they might have. When there are symptoms, they can be different in each person. Most often, when a person becomes infected with herpes for the first time, the symptoms will appear within 2 to 10 days. These first episodes of symptoms usually last 2 to 3 weeks.

      Early symptoms of a genital herpes outbreak include

      • Itching or burning feeling in the genital or anal area
      • Pain in the legs, buttocks, or genital area
      • Discharge of fluid from the vagina
      • Feeling of pressure in the abdomen

      Within a few days, sores appear near where the virus has entered the body, such as on the mouth, penis, or vagina (vaginal/labial herpes). They also can occur inside the vagina and on the cervix in women, or in the urinary passage of women and men. Small red bumps appear first, develop into blisters, and then become painful open sores. Over several days, the sores become crusty and then heal without leaving a scar.
      Other symptoms that may go with the first episode of genital herpes are fever, headache, muscle aches, painful or difficult urination, vaginal discharge, and swollen glands in the groin area.

      Can outbreaks recur?

      If you have been infected by HSV 1 and/or 2, you will probably have symptoms or outbreaks from time to time. After the virus has finished being active, it then travels to the nerves at the end of the spine where it stays for a while. Even after the lesions are gone, the virus stays inside the nerve cells in a still and hidden state, which means that it's inactive.

      In most people, the virus can become active several times a year. This is called a recurrence. But scientists do not yet know why this happens. When it becomes active again, it travels along the nerves to the skin, where it makes more viruses near the site of the very first infection. That is where new sores usually will appear.

      The frequency and severity of recurrent episodes vary greatly. While some people have only one or two outbreaks in a lifetime, others may have several outbreaks a year. The number and pattern of repeat outbreaks often change over time for a person. Scientists do not know what causes the virus to become active again. Although some people with herpes report that their outbreaks are brought on by another illness, stress, or having a menstrual period, outbreaks often are not predictable. In some cases, outbreaks may be connected to exposure to sunlight.

      How is genital herpes diagnosed?
      Doctors can diagnose genital herpes by looking at visible sores if the outbreak is typical, and by taking a sample from the sore for testing in a lab. Herpes can be difficult to diagnose between outbreaks. Blood tests, which detect HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibodies, can help to detect herpes in people without symptoms or during the time between outbreaks.

      Genital Herpes Treatment
      Although there is no cure in conventional medicine for genital herpes, your health care worker might prescribe one of three medicines to treat it as well as to help prevent future episodes.
      • Acyclovir (Zovirax)
      • Famciclovir (Famvir)
      • Valacyclovir (Valtrex)

      During an active herpes episode, whether the first episode or a repeat one, you should follow a few simple steps to speed healing and avoid spreading the infection to other places on the body or to other people.

      • Keep the infected area clean and dry to prevent other infections from developing.
      • Try to avoid touching the sores.
      • Wash your hands after contact with the sores.
      • Avoid sexual contact from the time you first feel any symptoms until the sores are completely healed, that is, the scab has fallen off and new skin has formed where the sore was.

      Can genital herpes cause any other problems?

      If a woman has her first episode of genital herpes while she is pregnant, she can pass the virus to her unborn child and may deliver a premature baby. Half of the babies infected with herpes either die or suffer from damage to their nerves. A baby born with herpes can develop serious problems that may affect the brain, the skin, or the eyes. If babies born with herpes are treated immediately with acyclovir, their chances of being healthy are increased.

      If a pregnant woman has an outbreak, which is not the first episode, her baby's risk of being infected during delivery is very low. In either case, if you are pregnant and infected with genital herpes, you should stay in close touch with your doctor before, during, and after your baby is born.

      If a woman is having an outbreak during labor and delivery and there are herpes lesions in or near the birth canal, the doctor will do a cesarean section to protect the baby. Most women with genital herpes, however, do not have signs of active infection with the virus during this time, and can have a normal delivery.

      Can I breastfeed if I have genital herpes?

      If you have genital herpes, you can keep breastfeeding as long as the sores are covered. Herpes is spread through contact with sores and can be dangerous to a newborn. If you have sores on your nipple or areola, the darker skin around the nipple, you should stop breastfeeding on that breast.

      Homeopathic Medicines for Genital Herpes
      Many homeopathic remedies have been known to cure genital herpes. Some of these are -

      Natrum mur, Petroleum Causticum, Crot-t, Dulcamara, Graphites, Hepar-sulph, Medorrhinum, Merc-sol, Sepia, Tellurium, Thuja, Anancardium, Aur-met, Calcarea, Crot-h, Jug-r, Nit-ac, Ph-ac, Sars, Sil, Ter, Rhus-tox.

      Homeopathy treats the person as a whole. It means that homeopathic treatment focuses on the patient as a person, as well as his pathological condition. The homeopathic medicines are selected after a full individualizing examination and case-analysis, which includes the medical history of the patient, physical and mental constitution etc.

      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/genital-herpes-symptoms-treatment-cure.asp
      ______________________________________

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  48. QUESTION:
    What can u get or appear on your penis?
    What are all the types of things can appear or u can get on your penis because i dont no what i got :( it kinda looks like a genital wart but the affects with genital warts exp itchyness, burning, hurts exsedra i dont experiance them help me please

    • ANSWER:
      There is alot types you may have, may be serious or not..have a read and get down to your doctor asap if i was you...good luck

      Types of spots

      Spots on the penis can be divided into groups according to their appearance.

      Ulcers: ulcers appear as craters on the skin and represent a full-thickness loss of skin (epidermis). There is frequently a crust, clear liquid (serum) or pus in the crater.

      Papules: papules are small (less than 1cm diameter) lesions (lumps) raised above the skin surface.

      Plaques: plaques are raised, flat-topped lesions, greater than 1cm in diameter.

      Ulcers

      Single penile ulcers frequently have a serious cause and it's important to seek prompt medical advice.

      Possible causes:

      primary syphilis: a single, round, painless ulcer on the penis or scrotum is characteristic of the first attack of (or primary) syphilis. It is caused by a spirochaete (spiral-shaped) bacterium called Treponema pallidum. The diagnosis must be confirmed by laboratory tests. It is an infectious STD.

      chancroid, granuloma inguinale, lymphogranuloma venereum: these are tropical diseases that cause a single, painless, foul-smelling ulcer. The diagnosis must be confirmed by laboratory tests. They should be suspected in men with a history of sexual contact in tropical areas. They are all infectious STDs.

      penile cancer (squamous cell carcinoma): may appear as a painless, irregular genital ulcer. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential and may be life-saving.

      Multiple penile ulcers are more common and may have a less serious cause. However, seeking prompt medical attention is still important. They can be divided into two groups: acute - present for less than two weeks - and chronic - present for more than two weeks.

      Acute

      Herpes simplex: this is the commonest cause of genital ulceration. It is caused by Herpesvirus hominis type two, or sometimes type one - the virus usually associated with oral herpes or cold sores. Herpes is characterised by recurrent bouts of genital vesicles, like small blisters, which rapidly break down to form small, painful ulcers. It is highly infectious and usually sexually transmitted. The first episode is usually associated with an acute feverish illness, which may be quite severe. The diagnosis must be confirmed by laboratory tests. Acute episodes can be effectively treated with antiviral medicines, such as aciclovir, although recurrences are common. Stress or other feverish illnesses may precipitate such recurrences.

      Secondary syphilis: multiple irregular, shallow, painless grey ulcers, sometimes described as 'serpiginous', like a snail track on the penis, are characteristic of secondary syphilis. It is caused by a spirochaete bacterium called Treponema pallidum. A flu-like illness and a blotchy, red rash usually accompany it over the body. As with primary syphilis, the diagnosis must be confirmed by laboratory tests. It is an infectious STD.

      Apthous ulcers: these are small, shallow, painful ulcers that most commonly appear in the mouth, but can also affect the penis. Typically, they have a grey centre surrounded by a bright red halo. They occur in crops and resolve without treatment. They can easily be confused with herpes simplex ulcers, so laboratory tests are necessary to reliably distinguish the two. They are not infectious and their cause is unknown.

      Chronic

      Pemphigus: this usually affects other parts of the body, frequently starting in the mouth, but may be restricted to the penis. It appears as fragile, thin-walled blisters that break down to form ulcers. These are often painful and may itch. There are a variety of different forms; the most severe type may affect the whole body and is life threatening. It is caused by a breakdown in the adhesion between different layers of the skin. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential.

      Behçet's disease: an inflammatory disorder affecting the skin, joints, nerves, eyes and other body systems.Symptoms may include large, deep and painful ulcers on the penis and scrotum, but is always accompanied by mouth ulcers. It is a potentially serious condition and prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential. It is not infectious.

      Reiter's syndrome: an inflammatory condition that occurs with generalised arthritis. About a quarter of affected men have small, ulcerated plaques around the glans and foreskin. It can also affect muscles, the eyes and nails. It is caused by an abnormal immune response to a gut or genital infection. It may follow a prolonged, relapsing course, but can be treated. Reiter's syndrome is not itself infectious, but the germs that might cause it are. Some of them can be sexually transmitted.

      Papules

      Most penile papules do not have a serious cause, but some are infectious and may lead to more serious conditions. An early penile cancer may also appear as a papule before ulcerating. It is important to seek prompt medical advice about penile papules.

      Molluscum contagiosum: a common, benign, infectious viral disease affecting the skin and mucous membranes. It is a common skin condition in childhood when it is transmitted through ordinary peer contact. In adults it may be sexually transmitted and this is probably the commonest cause of penile molluscum in adult men. It appears as multiple, small, dome-shaped papules, often with a central depression or plug. A curd-like discharge can be squeezed from them. It may disappear without treatment, but freezing or cautery will usually get rid of it. Molluscum contagiosum is a marker for 'unsafe' sexual practices in adulthood and those affected should be screened for HIV

      Hair follicles and sebaceous (sweat) glands: these are a normal part of the skin's anatomy and are commonly found on the penile shaft, particularly on the ventral surface (underside). They may be visible as small nodules or might only be felt as small lumps in the skin. They will have a hair arising from them that reveals their true nature. They are quite normal.

      Pearly penile papules: multiple, small (about 1-3mm) papules running around the circumference of the crown of the glans penis. They typically develop in men aged 20 to 40, and around 10 per cent of all men are affected. They may be mistaken for warts, are not infectious and require no treatment.

      Fordyce spots: small (1-5mm) bright red or purple papules that can appear on the glans, shaft or scrotum and usually affect younger men. They may occur as a solitary lesion, but frequently appear in crops of 50 to 100. They are painless and not itchy, but may cause embarrassment because of their appearance, or a fear that they might be sexually transmitted. They are abnormally dilated blood vessels, covered by thickened skin. They may bleed if injured or even during intercourse. They are not infectious and their cause is unknown. Although a number of approaches have been tried, there is no simple, reliable treatment to remove them. Troublesome bleeding spots can be sealed with a device that uses a small electric current (electrocautery).

      Psoriasis: most commonly affects other parts of the body, particularly the knees, elbows and scalp, but occasionally first appears on the penis, usually on the glans or inner surface of the foreskin. Psoriasis appears as thickened red papules or plaques with a well-defined edge. In uncircumcised men, and at other sites, it has a scaly surface. It rarely causes irritation. It is caused by an abnormality of skin production and can be inherited. It is unsightly, but rarely serious. There are a number of effective treatments available, such as steroid creams and calcipotriol cream (Dovonex).

      Warts: a number of different types of wart may appear on the penis. Genital warts are caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) and are infectious. They may be single or multiple, skin-coloured, pink or brown, with a moist surface. HPV infection is associated with the development of cervical and anal cancer, so it is important that sexual partners are screened for evidence of infection. They can be treated in a variety of ways, from skin paints to cautery, but are sometimes very difficult to eradicate.

      Plaques

      Penile plaques do not usually have a serious cause, but some are infectious and others may develop into more serious conditions: Erythroplasia of Queyrat, lichen sclerosis and balanitis xerotica obliterans may lead to the development of penile cancer.Make sure you seek prompt medical advice about penile plaques.

      Balanitis and posthitis: balanitis is an inflammatory condition of the glans penis. Posthitis is an inflammatory condition of the foreskin. Symptoms include local irritation, burning and a red rash. Sometimes the skin appears to be peeling off as if scalded. Bacteria and yeasts such as candida can cause it. It is more common in older men and those with diabetes. Balanitis is infectious and may be sexually transmitted. It can be treated with appropriate antimicrobial creams.

      Erythroplasia of Queyrat: appears as a sharply demarcated bright red plaque with a velvety surface. It is usually painless, and not itchy. It is an early manifestation of penile cancer and needs prompt diagnosis and treatment. Excision of the affected area is usually curative. It is not infectious.

      Zoon's plasma cell balanitis: Zoon's balanitis appears as a bright red, shiny-surfaced plaque on the glans or inner surface of the foreskin. It is usually painless but may be accompanied by itching. The cause is unknown. It may respond to application of steroid cream, but frequently recurs. Circumcision is curative, but not essential. It is a harmless condition but can be confused with the much more serious condition of Erythroplasia of Queyrat. It is not infectious.

      Lichen sclerosis and balanitis xerotica obliterans: lichen sclerosis appears as white plaques on the glans, fore

  49. QUESTION:
    Can you answer these questions about Herpes?
    Full name of the virus
    Name of infection/disease it causes
    Family in which it is classified
    What is the mode of infection(airborne, animal borne...)
    Initial and late symptoms of the viral infection
    Is there a treatment for the infection?
    Is there a vaccine available? If so whats it called
    any question you can answer is very appreciated. Thanks <3

    • ANSWER:
      Herpes Simplex Virus
      HSV-1 (oral, like in or around your mouth) and HSV-2 (genital) SORES or "bumps"
      Herpesviridae
      "HSV-1 is usually acquired orally during childhood, but may also be sexually transmitted. HSV-2 is primarily a sexually transmitted infection but rates of HSV-1 genital infections are increasing."

      Symptoms for many ppl BEFORE: Fatigue, feeling cold, hot, weak, like you have a fever, uncomfortable. DURING: "clusters of inflamed papules and vesicles on the outer surface of the genitals resembling cold sores." ITCHY PAINFUL BURNING sensation. AFTER: the first breakout is the worst. Afterwards you only get a small breakout every once in a while. Anything can cuase it..

      "Herpes viruses establish lifelong infections and the virus cannot currently be eradicated from the body. Treatment usually involves general-purpose antiviral drugs that interfere with viral replication, reducing the physical severity of outbreak-associated lesions and lowering the chance of transmission to others. Studies of vulnerable patient populations have indicated that daily use of antivirals such as acyclovir and valacyclovir can reduce reactivation rates." NO CURE

      Hope this helped.

  50. QUESTION:
    How long will you get herpes simplex 1 after you have been exposed to it (had sex with someone with it)?

    • ANSWER:
      First of all Herpes Simplex one is not an STD. Herpes Simplex one, if Herpes Zoster, almost all of us have had chicken pox as a child. Once you have chicken pox, which is caused by the Herpes Zoster virus. This virus, lies dormant in your spinal column, until your immune system is low, and you have fever blisters break out around your lips, on your lips or in your mouth, perhaps even your nose. Now one can have oral sex with herpes simplex one, (herpes simplex one is above the belt line), and if the other person gets a lesion from oral sex, then it becomes herpes simplex 2, which is a STD because it has been transferred below the belt to the genital area. Your question is how long, incubation period is 2 to 4 weeks. But if your lucky enough not to have gotten it this time. Try not to have oral sex, especially when lesion is present for it's' a pretty sure thing, you will eventually get it or give it to your partner. Herpes Simplex 2, really is the disease that keeps on giving.

herpes simplex mouth lesions

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